consequence-2

Consequence Flies Kyte To Stay Hot

With a black cell phone in hand, Queens-bred rapper Consequence

weaves in and out the backstage halls on the Glow in the Dark Tour.

 

“Pretty lady alert!” Consequence shouts. “Pretty lady

alert!”

 

Statuesque females of different races smile and wave coyly

into the camera phone’s lenses before dashing into pockets of entertainers,

moguls, and crews. The energy is hypnotic and your senses are teased into

keeping up because if you blink you might miss Kanye West walking out of his

dressing room or tune out Taz Arnold’s political plug urging you to “vote Obama

way.”

 

Just a simple click on your computer’s mouse or cell phone’s

keypad instantly takes you to video logs from behind the scenes of one the

year’s most successful tours courteous of ConsTV.

 

“We only gonna bring you the best,” said Consequence, on his

first video mobile show. “I’mma show ya everything! Everything! Everything!”

 

And that he does via a new digital media platform known as

Kyte.

 

Kyte broke into the mobile and online tech worlds in 2006

when its co-founders, Daniel Graf and Erik Abair, introduced web communities to

a program that produce, brand, and distribute content to multiple destinations.

 

“Our view is that the brand is the destination, and fans

should be able to watch branded content wherever they are,” said Graf, in an

email.

 

There are four major components that separate Kyte from its

competitors, according to Graf. First, Kyte is not a destination site. It can

be viewed on a custom player with advertisements on the artists’s website, as

well as, message boards like the Ill

Community, social networks like Facebook, blogs, and mobile phones. Second,

with it’s Kyte Mobile Producer for Nokia S60 phones, users can instantly record

and upload content via web camera, digital camera or phone. Third, an embedded chat

component allows fans to communicate with artists in real time. And fourth,

channels are automatically updated whenever new material is produced—a key

feature when an artist’s channel is embedded onto thousands of sites.

 

Sounds like YouTube? Yes and no. Kyte has attracted the

attention of hip-hop artists such as Consequence because of the vast

possibilities it provides artists to get their shine on—just brighter.

 

Already a fervent YouTube producer, with his video column

series “Real Men Don’t Cry” where he interviews respected figures in the music

and entertainment industry who offer insight on “making it in the game,”

Consequence was gradually earning an online following. The show was picked up

by OnSmash.com and gained thousands of hits and props flooded the comments

section.

 

However, it was his January 2008 YouTube video documenting

his triumphant Connect Four win against Jay-Z that “got a gang of attention,”

earning over 300,000 hits on his channel to date. Intimate and raw footage like

this would propel Consequence’s online status on his custom Kyte channel.

 

His first introduction to Kyte was through combing the

websites of fellow hip-hop artists like 50 Cent. The General of G-Unit’s

channel is featured on “thisis50.com,” as well as, his MySpace and a number of

BlackPlanet fans’ pages earning him over 3 million total views thus far.

Consequence recognized the magnitude of power Kyte possessed in sharing not

only music, but also connecting with fans on a personal level.

 

After hopping aboard the Glow in the Dark Tour in April,

Gabe Brosbe, Kyte’s business development manager, reached out to Consequence

and officially put him on to Kyte. The rapper joined a community of musicians,

athletes, television and radio stations, bloggers, publications, and companies

making up over 64,000 Kyte channels from around the world, according to Graf.

 

Capturing the happenings on-stage and backstage of the Tour

for fans to relive the moment or engage for the first time was the perfect

subject for the debut of ConsTV.

 

“This was the first tour where I’ve gotten some footage, and

on a personal level,” said Consequence. “I remember Russell Simmons’ The Show

Tour and because of the lack of technology, I’ve seen very little footage

floating around.”

 

Thanks to Kyte, Consequence is able to “capture some of

those special moments” and more exclusives including Mos Def discussing the

last Black Star album, Kanye West celebrating his birthday, Pharrell doing a

dead on impersonation of Busta Rhymes, Jay-Z’s Madison Square Garden

performance of “Jockin’ Jay-Z,” and A Tribe Called Quest in what looks like a

home-made studio spitting a few rhymes.

 

“Using Kyte, I’m bringing fans into my world and giving my

perspective,” said Consequence. “A lot of people didn’t know me from working

with Kanye, A Tribe Called Quest, and the other circles I move through. ConsTV

really gets it across.”

 

With 62 shows played on 13,619 websites and over 1 million

total views to date, he’s become quite the online megastar.

 Dana L. Oliver is a multimedia journalist and blogger. She

is particularly interested in hip-hop, visual arts, and the representation of

minorities in mass media. Check out her blog, D’Real, at www.danalana.com.

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