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Knockout Nation: Vitali Makes Peter Quit! Dawson Too Much for Tarver, Mayweather Speaks on Retirement, Carlos Zarate

Vitali Domination Forces Peter to Quit

Nearly

four years of inactivity proved insignificant to former champ Vitali

Klitschko (36-2, 35 KOs), as the Ukrainian giant easily beat Samuel

Peter (30-2, 23 KOs) into submission over eight one-sided rounds.

In

round one, the towering Klitschko immediately let Peter know he meant

business by wobbling the Nigerian Nightmare with lead left hooks. The

straight right hand was also on display as the Ukrainian measured him

effortlessly from the outside.

After

looking worried in the corner, Peter fared no better in round two, now

being countered repeatedly with lead left hooks whenever he lunged in.

Adding to Peter’s woes, the increasingly confident Vitali began

clubbing the American heavyweight with triple jabs.

Already

laboring by the third, the WBC titlist’s sluggish punch output was

reflected most in the lack of snap on his jab, which he was pushing out

and leaving himself open to be countered. Dr. Iron Fist remained

composed and continued his best Ali impersonation by throwing jabs and

lead hooks from his hip on a hapless Peter. For all the shots he took,

all WBC champ could show for it was a partially blocked left hook to

the body.

Round

four saw Peter get the worst early on of a jabbing contest, and get

countered by a monstrous counter right over a wild left hook. A

swelling and bleeding Peter became desperate and launched a clumsy bull

rush at Klitschko, only to see the former champ coolly take a step back

and deflect every blow.

Klitschko

utilized rounds six and seven to let his jab almost exclusively bust up

the fading Peter, who had become the nothing more than a punching bag.

Wary of applying pressure because of the hard jabs crashing into his

nose, Peter stayed perilously at the end of Vitali’s range and was

punished with straight and overhand rights for his trouble.

In

between rounds, Samuel Peter’s corner implored him to press the fight

and throw combinations to stifle the beating he was taking. But the

fighter’s looks of resignation and helplessness were clear in detailing

that it was not a matter of if, but when Peter would succumb to the

punishment.

Sensing

weakened prey, Klitschko stormed out for round eight throwing an

impressive mix of firepower: double jab-straight right combos, double

lead left hooks, and the occasional counter right uppercut. Taking

another drubbing, Peter with both eyes swollen and mouth spurting blood

returned to the corner looking for a way out.

Seated

before the ninth, Peter shook his head multiple times while his trainer

tried to give advice for the next round. With a microphone right below

his fighter, the trainer asked Peter to repeat his mumbled statement,

to which Peter replied “no more…stop it.”

By

quitting on his stool, Peter relinquishes the WBC heavyweight title to

Vitali Klitschko. The win also makes Vitali the first fighter to win a

title in his first fight back after nearly four years, and the first to

hold a world title simultaneously with a sibling in the same weight

class.

Last

week, I stated that the Vitali Klitschko of four years ago would have

defeated Peter, but little did I or anyone suspect that same Vitali

would enter the ring this past Saturday. Klitschko showed great

accuracy, stamina, and ring generalship to box circles around his

younger foe.

Unfortunately

the glory may be short-lived, as the more exciting Klitshcko at 37

years-old hasn’t decided whether he will continue fighting. Previously,

Vitali expressed a main goal of wanting to hold a title along with his

brother, which he has now achieved. Plus, there is no chance to unify

if he stays since the brothers have vowed never to fight each other.

For

Peter, the loss marks another setback when faced against his best

competition. And as pointed out by the Showtime announce team, the loss

again reveals Peter’s huge liabilities when paired against a larger

foe, as seen with Wladimir Klitschko, Jameel McCline, and now Vitali

Klitschko.

Dawson’s Speed Befuddles Tarver to Decision

Chad

Dawson’s words couldn’t shut Antonio Tarver’s mouth these past few

months, but last Saturday the speed of his hands sure did.

Executing

a game-plan based on lightning fast combinations and a consistent body

attack, former WBC champ Chad Dawson (27-0, 17 KOs) outworked cagey

veteran Antonio Tarver (27-5, 19 KOs) to a unanimous decision win.

For

the first two rounds Tarver struggled to find any rhythm against the

younger Dawson, and was visibly shaken by the young lion’s five to six

punch hook combinations to the body. In addition, the power behind Bad

Chad’s punches physically knocked Tarver back throughout the rounds and

prevented the loquacious pugilist from mounting significant counter

attacks.

In

round three Tarver found Dawson’s rhythm and timed him with an overhand

left. Dawson in his zeal to respond was then stunned by a sneaky

uppercut. Now cautious of being caught again, Tarver secured the rest

of the round on punch volume as the challenger remained in a defensive

shell.

Dawson

got back on track in rounds four and five, showcasing dazzling hook

counters to confuse the champion. Along with cracking shots downstairs,

Dawson again would knock Tarver off-balance with his counter hooks to

easily take the rounds.

Taking

round six off, Dawson unwisely spent the round goading Tarver to attack

him, a possible receipt for the months of trash-talking he endured.

Even though this made have given Dawson some emotional gratification,

his abysmal punch activity allowed Tarver to steal another round.

However,

in rounds seven through nine Dawson kept Tarver guessing with

unpredictable, explosive combinations. The spontaneous assaults keep

Tarver for committing completely to his punches, as he became more

concerned on whenever he would be strafed to the body with five to

eight blinding punches.

Still,

Dawson’s inexperience gave Tarver late chances to get back into the

fight. Partly due to fatigue and concentration lapses, Tarver was able

to outhustle Dawson in rounds ten and eleven. Here, Dawson again

lowered his punch output too much against Tarver’s consistent work-rate.

Aware

he was far behind, Tarver started the final round desperate for the

knockout. Throwing caution to the wind, the 2-time Roy Jones conqueror

pounced on Dawson looking to land a homerun shot.

Unfortunately for Tarver, Dawson’s superior hand speed would again be the deciding factor.

Over a lazy Tarver setup jab, Dawson fired a quick counter left hook that spun Tarver, dropping him for a balance knockdown.

Secure

that the definitive stamp was put on the contest, Dawson cautiously

finished the round and his best mainstream win to date.

Scores for the unanimous decision win for Chad Dawson were 118-109 and 117-110 twice.

In the post-fight interview, Dawson gave credit to Floyd Mayweather Jr., who called him before the fight to express his support.

“He

gave me a call in the locker room and told me I’m the best fighter in

the world hands down,” Dawson explained. “Just to get a call from Floyd

Mayweather to big me up like that was a big confidence booster for me.

I was thinking about that all in the locker room. I knew I had to come

out and put on a show.”

With the win, Chad Dawson now becomes a viable option for the winner of Roy Jones-Joe Calzaghe next month.

For

Antonio Tarver, the 39 year-old finds himself having to rebuild once

again, and may want to consider engaging in a rubber-match with fellow

veteran Glen Johnson.

Floyd Mayweather Shoots Down Comeback Rumors

In

attendance at the Dawson-Tarver fight, former pound for pound king

Floyd Mayweather addressed rumblings that his return to the ring is

inevitable.

“No,

I’m just here to support young fighters like Chad Dawson and all the

fighters out there right now,” Money May clarified. “You have MMA out

there now. I just wanna wish all the fighters out there the best.

Absolutely [I’m retired].”

Holyfield Gets Another Title Shot Against Valuev

Evander Holyfield, who turns 46 this month, has been offered a shot against WBA champion Nikolai Valuev in December.

According to Valuev’s management team, an offer has been sent to the former champ and is pending finalization.

Holyfield, a three time heavyweight champion, last fought October 13, 2007, losing a lopsided decision to Sultan Ibragimov.

Despite

fears for the health and reports that his speech is already slurred,

it’s expected that Holyfield will move forward with his latest attempt

at another heavyweight title.

Throwback Fighter of the Week: Carlos Zarate

Possessing

power rarely seen at the lower weights, former bantamweight champion

Carlos Zarate was one of the most exciting knockout artists of the

1970s.

Turning

pro in 1970, Zarate quickly made history as the only boxer to have 20

or more knockouts in a row after starting his career with 23 successive

knockouts.

By 1976, he earned a WBC title shots against fellow Mexican Rodolfo Martinez, who he knocked out in eight rounds.

After

three successful defenses, Zarate met fellow undefeated Mexican and WBA

bantamweight champion in 1977 in what was dubbed “The Battle of the Z

Boys.” Hated rivals, Zarate emerged victorious from the grudge match

shootout with a 4th round TKO.

The

following year Zarate didn’t prove as lucky moving up to Super

Bantamweight against another rival in Wilfredo Gomez. Being too small

to hurt the naturally bigger Gomez, Zarate suffered his first loss via 5th

round TKO. The fight is also notable to pitting two fighters who at the

time of their meeting had the highest knockout percentages in history

between them: Gomez at 21-0, 21 KOs and Zarate at 55-0, 54 KOs.

Another

setback came the following year, as Zarate suffered a heart-breaking

split decision loss to Lupe Pintor despite flooring his gym-mate in the

4th.

After the loss, Zarate retired for five years before launching a comeback in 1985.

Despite

a string of 11 straight KOs including one of over #1 contender Richard

Savage, Zarate ultimately lost his biggest contests against WBC Super

Bantemweight champ Jeff Fenech in 1987 (4th round TD on accidental butt) and in 1988 against Daniel Zaragoza via 10th round stoppage.

Retiring for good after the defeat, Zarate joined the International Boxing Hall of Fame during the 1990s.

His final record stands at 66-4, 63 KOs.

Zarate vs. Zamora

Zarate vs. MartinezZarate vs. Morales

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