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B. Rossi: Live In The Sky

B. Rossi is a Georgia bred and feed emcee that has many

tastemakers attentively watching his next move. He understands the sound that

carries him and while most rappers do or do not write their selections, Bossi

composes a tapestry of favorable tunes that will occupy avid listeners.

 

With a blockbuster movie already included under his

portfolio B. Rossi is now pursuing music with the vengeance of a scorned

veteran reclaiming the art form. If you think his music will be good than you

should know that it’s better than that by far. B. Rossi opens up to

AllHipHop.com to provide a window into his world of Hip-Hop. MusicB. Rossi “Welcome To Aviator Land”B. Rossi “Change”

 

AllHipHop.com: So

tell me about your adventures through hip hop what led you to pursuit a career

as a rapper?

 

B.

Rossi: A number of things led me to pursue rap. When I was in the

11th grade I got the chance to be in the movie “Drumline.” I played

instruments in high school and my band was chosen to be featured in the film

with Nick Cannon. I had a chance to be on set everyday and see Dallas Austin

and Nick Cannon and after watching them I decided that- that was what I wanted

to do. I went off to college and it didn’t work out, but while I was there I

got a chance to work on some records for some established artist then I just

knew that was what I wanted to do by any means.

B. Rossi featuring Jake Troth – “Gems & Rubies”

 

AllHipHop.com: You

live in Atlanta do you find that it’s harder for the truly talented artist to

get on because the city is oversaturated with just so much of every and any body

trying to rap now?

 

B.

Rossi: Oh most definitely I feel that artist like B.O.B. and

myself are the next generation of true hip hop pioneers coming out of Atlanta.

It’s hard for true artist like us to come out of Atlanta because of radio and

the type of music that does over saturate the market now. I found the solution

to be going hard on the Internet. That’s the only way for people with true

talent to really get out and be heard.

 

AllHipHop.com: You

had experience from being a part of your school’s marching band how did those

skills transcend into hip hop for you?

 

B.

Rossi: Being in a marching band teaches you discipline. Then on

the instrument side you learn to work with a lot of different sounds and

rhythms. I take all of that and put it together with all the rap and flows and

creativity. I feel like I have an advantage other many rappers because I

understand how the music is made. I have a lot of input on my production. 

 

AllHipHop.com: I

know Amir mentioned that you are apart of his artist development. What does

that entail as far as what type of regiment must one go thru in order to become

developed enough to make it in entertainment?

 

 

B.

Rossi: Amir is a good dude cause he understand the whole process

of making music. A lot of times artist don’t like to work with people when they

think that person may not get where they are going, but with Amir I don’t have

that problem. I don’t mind allowing him to come into my creative space. That’s

mainly the regiment just not being selfish with the creative process and

working with those that will help you craft your sound. I think it works out

great cause if you think about Michael Jackson, he didn’t make “Thriller” all

by himself even he needed a little help. I actually enjoy hearing someone

else’s point of view over something that I create. 

 

AllHipHop.com:

What are you doing personally to make sure that you become educated and as

knowledgeable as possible about the ins and outs of the music business?

 

B.

Rossi: Man I actually read a lot of industry books. But not only

the books just being able to gain actual experience has really taught me a lot.

I’ve been around the industry all my life, and I’ve always asked a lot of

questions. I never think that I know everything so I try to further what I do

know and branch out. The music business can be confusing and people will try to

get over on you so it can be crazy. There is no exact way to be successful in

the music industry because everybody had to take their own route, and

everybody’s success story is different. The one thing that I have learned is to

never give up.

 

AllHipHop.com:

Tell me your mission with The Aviator Band.

 

B.

Rossi: My mission with the Aviator Band is to bring back live

music to the forefront. Back in the day you had groups like Parliament and

Earth, Wind, and Fire and I want to see that come back. It’s a label but it’s

more than a label because it’s a place where people with music experience can

come together and be apart of the creative process. It’s a place where people

can respect the elements of live music and build a movement. People with a true

talent all over the world can come together and be comfortable.  I actually perform with a live band whenever

I perform. My band “Members Only” consists of a drummer, a keyboardist,

electric guitar, and DJ. It’s another type of vibe when you play with a band

behind you. Most of the music put out now is so digital, but having an actual

band just makes everything feel so real and authentic.

 

AllHipHop.com:

What was the concept behind your mixtape “The Grocery List?”

 

B.

Rossi: Well that’s where I work; I work at the grocery store. I

haven’t made it to the point in my career where I can live off of my music

alone. All the songs are concepts that I thought about while I was at work. I

called it “The Grocery List” because that’s where a lot of my writing goes

down. I have a lot of ideas and thoughts that take place while I’m at work and

it goes into my music.

 

AllHipHop.com:

Tell me a little about your EP “Escape From America” which is coming out in

May?

 

B.

Rossi: Well I don’t have a definite street date so I would say

around late May because we’re still in the mixing process.  The EP is basically a representation of all

my talents being showcased. You have to be consistent with the music in order

to survive in this game. There’s going to be 18 records on the EP. The concept

is that there’s a social aspect to the music. The things that are not

celebrated in the music are the things that I will be talking about in my

music.

 

AllHipHop.com:  What have you found to be the best method of

conversion with introducing you to new fans?

 

B.

Rossi: Being all the way honest when you’re out and doing shows

just going up to people and talking to them. You can’t assume that people will

just think that you are great. You have to communicate with them and convince

them that you are a great artist. It’s like going to a church. You don’t just

follow the preacher because he’s religious; he has to prove himself as being a

man of truth first.

 

AllHipHop.com: How

many personal sacrifices have you had to make to be where you are with the

music today?

 

B.

Rossi: Ok for one I didn’t get to finish school and I own like

100k in debt. Next I work at the grocery store in order to support my home

studio and myself. I don’t get to go out too much. Like even when we had

Freaknik here in Atlanta and all my friends wanted to go out but I couldn’t

cause I gotta work tonight. I never get to go out because I’m always at home

trying to remain diligent to what I do because I know that truthfully it’s

going to pay off one day.

 

AllHipHop.com: I

know you say sticking to the script will get you rich. How do you define

sticking to the script?

 

B.

Rossi: That’s what it is sticking to the script and that’s what

I’m going to do until I make it. It’s all about working hard and being myself.

I’m not doing what everybody else does. I do what works for me and therefore

I’m going to be sticking to the script.

 

AllHipHop.com: I

know you’re unsigned but when you get signed how do you plan on celebrating?

Any big spending that you want to do?

 

B.

Rossi: You know what I never even think about any major purchases

when I get signed. I’m not really a big car person either. I just want to get

the simple things in life like a house. 

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