Earl-Eminem

Earl Sweatshirt Blasts Eminem’s Recent Music


(AllHipHop News) Many observers feel as if the Odd Future camp is an extension of Eminem’s musical tree. But after the crew’s leader Tyler, The Creator blasted Em’s Shady XV compilation album in 2014, another OF comrade has expressed he is not feeling the Detroit legend’s most recent work either.

[ALSO READ: Tyler The Creator Calls Eminem’s “Shady XV” Album “Ass”]

Earl Sweatshirt did a recent interview with Spin, and the creator of the lauded I Don’t Like Sh*t, I Don’t Go Outside album was asked if he still follows Eminem’s new music.

“Hell nah! Sorry! [laughs],” replied Earl. “If you still follow Eminem, you drink way too much Mountain Dew and probably need to like, come home from the army.”

While he did not hold back his thoughts about Slim Shady, Sweatshirt was also critical of his own work. He admitted he is not a fan of his 2013 LP Doris. In contrast, the 21-year-old Los Angeles native offered praise for some of his rap contemporaries.

“We finally went into these chambers of our own selves that we hadn’t gone into before. Like Vince [Staples] went back to the time that changed him, which was summertime 2006 and I just kind of examined where I was at his time,” said Earl. “Same with Future and same with Kendrick. N*ggas are evaluating where they’re at right now. Even Drake! ‘Please do not talk to me like I’m that Drake from four years ago/I’m in a higher place.’ He’s talking to you about him right now. So any of the sh*t that’s sticking is because it’s current and honest.”

[ALSO READ: Earl Sweatshirt Says Drake Can Be A “Vulture” On Young Rapper’s Work]

  • John jonesbone

    Irrelevent ass

  • El Dogga

    WHO???????????????????????

  • Anthony Mason

    Eminem’s new music sucks. “brainless” on MMLP 2 is the last song to even be close to duplicating what I Iiked about him in the first place..

  • Damany G

    I agree, although Em is a supreme lyricists, much of his music is straight popcorn in terms of the production value. Dope lyrics over pop beats but the formula works for mainstream purposes but not for the genre of Hip-Hop

    • ladynamor

      LMAO Supreme Lyricists. FOH.

      • RichFromBX

        Rakim, KRS, Jay Z, Nas all co-signed Em being one of the greatest so in comparison, your opinion means little and demonstrates you know nothing so put your headphones on and let your Young Thug album rock…

      • DJ7

        Opinions….she’s entitled to hers too champ

      • RichFromBX

        I feel you but if you’re going to crap on someone else’s opinion, you have to expect it in return….

      • DJ7

        True

      • mademan3000

        They were tryna be politically correct what else did u expect them to say.

      • RichFromBX

        look at that list and tell me who there is worried about being PC. They’re all from the era where lyrics said it all…you had them or you didn’t and if you didn’t, you can bet for damn sure no one was going to sugar coat their thoughts about your trash.

      • Damany G

        Explain how not?, you make the statement back it up

  • Brindle

    these young cats run their mouths too much… You really gonna just tamper with Ems money like that… Hiphop needs to get back to beefing for real, not twitter… it’s bout time for someone to get shot, not killed just shot, beat up, pistol whipped… Rappers lost their edge

    • RazaBladeKing

      Yoooo… on some real s***, I actually agree with this wholeheartedly. These nerds and sissies have gotten too comfortable talkin reckless and sayin whatever they want, cuz hip hop has gotten PG and everybody wants to hold hands and sing kumabaya. If people were still gettin slapped up, choked out and, yup, shot at like the 90s, there’d be a whole lot less of all this out-of-pocket activity. And I bet the music would be better too, cuz it was then.

      • Brindle

        you’d have a better balance of music, info, interviews, etc…

    • Anthony Mason

      Maybe one of these little hoes does need to get touched. Earl is a nice kid though so not him. He has a point. Everyone who was in the post mortem abomination known odd future are Eminem fans….

      He birthed those faggots….

  • hands mahoney

    so he’s dissing the military which is protecting his spoiled child lifestyle? ok

    • DJ7

      Smh…protecting us HOW? I’ll wait…

      • Q.

        UH-OH!

      • hands mahoney

        who’s us? when did i mention you? i’ll wait.

      • DJ7

        FOH…changing your comment then replying on said comment a month later…clown a$$ kracker

  • Larry Sandwiches

    MMLP2 suffered from too much of Rick Rubin’s influence not meshing with Eminem’s style.

    • Anthony Mason

      Eminem blasts off on every bass heavy mid to low tempo beat. Dre had the formula…

      Em please drop a classic again…. I’ll even stop listening to rap if you do. I just want one more good album and the rest of my life is my own production and digging through old records. These guys blow so bad I can’t justify buying itunes songs anymore….

      You have the money and time and resources. Just f***ing do it…..

  • Pingback: Earl Sweatshirt Blasts Eminem’s Recent Music | HUEY mix wit RILEY()

  • KashIsKlay

    Eminem put out 5 quality projects – Slim Shady LP, Marshall Mathers LP, Eminem show, Infinite and the 8 mile soundtrack. Those were all classics. But everything after that has been trash.

    • in yo ass hard

      sorry man i was a big em fan but one thing i can say is that he doesn’t have a classic. Great albums but no classic

      • KashIsKlay

        I was a big em fan too. He was my favorite once upon a time. But Marshall Mathers, Eminem Show and Slim Shady were classic albums.

      • illynois95

        I swear people will not admit the obvious just because he is white. Hardly any hip hop albums get played all the way through as often as those 3 do 15 years after their release. People I know still know all the words to half the songs on those albums.

    • ursocalledgod

      to call something a classic it has to be universally recognized and that includes the streets/ hood/ etc. dude has not ONE fuccing classic that we fux with. go to any hip hop alltime classics and see where you see an em song. it might be classic to the suburban white boys and white college dudes but in the hood no way kid.

      • KashIsKlay

        Nope

      • ursocalledgod

        name me some classic songs than homie. where you can hear in the hood or any hip hop club, park, or coming out of someones ride that aint a suburban whiteboy. don’t worry ill wait…

      • KashIsKlay

        Nobody in the hood is playing eminem now. Back in 02-04 most definitely.

      • ursocalledgod

        lmao I don’t know what hood you were in but im from the eastside of the D his ” hometown” and I use that shyt loosely and you didn’t hear his shyt at ALL bruh.

      • KashIsKlay

        That explains everything. You probably listen to trash like Icewear Vezzo. Warren is his hometown if you want to be exact.

      • ursocalledgod

        lmao naw bruh you know what they say about ASSuming right? face, nas, push, jay, black thought jada, rae, ghost that’s the type of shyt I fux with. yea I know where hes from I didn’t need the fun fact lil fella.

      • illynois95

        stop bringing up the hood like their opinion is relevant. they are the ones bumping ignorant s— like Rick Ross and Gucci Mane and Future and all these non-emcees. Em still has music from 2000 that gets regular rotation, and just because it’s not your group of friends that does it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen or that it makes it less of a classic. the “streets” are the least informed about what music is good. How often to the “streets” bump Illmatic or Reasonable Doubt? hardly ever. Shut up with that. Em is a better emcee than your favorite, period.

      • ursocalledgod

        Lmao you must be a teenager. I didn’t say what the radio bumps lil fella. I said what real hip hop heads embrace as classics. The streets is where this music was born bred and still breathes at. No pop emcee will ever get that love so you and your friends go ahead and keep rocking I’m not afraid, two trailer park girls, monster, my name is, cleaning out my closet or the apology to his mother song or any of them corny azz songs. The hood will keep rocking shyt we can relate to. Nas, Jay, pac, BIG, roots, ghost, Rae, push, Cole, Kendrick, run the jewels etc.

      • illynois95

        Nope 25. I will put my hop hop knowledge up against yours any day. And pound for pound lyrically em is better than any of those dudes. Hell I’ll bet i can quote more of those dudes songs than you could (except j Cole and kendrick, and youwanna talk about pop, smh) Damn near everyone you named that’s still alive has cosigned em in some way. And you only named his singles. Ignorant.

      • ursocalledgod

        Lyrically he’s better than Nas? Black thought? Kendrick? LMAO Nas was named the number one lyricist/ writer of this fuccing century by Cnn, Time and numerous hip hop sites and blogs. Other artists respect his lyricism and word play you never hear them name any of his corny azz songs. They look at it from a whole different perspective than a fan. You matching wits would me about this music I’ve seen from the beginning to what it is now is like picking up a ball and trying to play Jordan in his prime. Stay in your lane lil fella. 25…LMAO.

      • illynois95

        Yes. In any rap battle Em would win. If there was a way to measure lyrical/wordplay ability, Em would win by a landslide. Even against Nas, even against Black thought. Only one to come remotely close would be Pharoahe Monch, and he would still lose. And yea, I’d gladly put my hip hop collection against yours. Anyone who says that “the streets” opinion is so important, probably isn’t that deep of a listener. Can you even name a rapper from Project Blowed? Anticon? Probably not even Rhymesayers. Because you only care what the low lifes from “the streets” are playing, which in this day and age is a bunch of ignorant s— that condones taking molly, selling drugs, and killing black people.

        I went off on a tangent. Em is a great rapper, you are just a hater.

      • ursocalledgod

        That’s why you’re out of your league youngin. Don’t confuse when I say the streets or the hood with the ignorant shyt in the radio or bet. I’m talking about the block, house party, ciphers, underground hip hop clubs. Where do you think real hip hop was born and still breathes? Corporate America, record sales? Let me give you a clue THE STREETS graffiti artists, djs, break dancers etc all STREETS. not talking about battle rapping come on bruh lmao FOH. You name drop underground emcees, rhymesayers etc so you put em on the same level as say a Brother Ali? Rhymfest? FOH. The streets can relate to every artist I named we can’t relate to that comedic or corny shyt em spit. Battle rapping LMAO we’re done here lol fella.

      • illynois95

        uhhhh, I’ve seen Em get love in all of those categories. If you haven’t then you’ve clearly had a pretty limited exposure to different demographics. Bottom line, Em has hip hop classics. Not all his s— is comedic. You are clearly biased, but more people listen to his old stuff than 99.9% of the other stuff that came out back then, which indicates classic status. Whether or not it is the people that you want it to be is irrelevant. But I digress. I am still a fan of most of the people you named, especially The Roots and Wu-Tang, so props on that. Happy travels.

      • ursocalledgod

        You too. Be easy.

      • Q.

        Hey, not trying to jump in this argument, but peep this: There are a lot of ill lyricists with crazy lyricism and wordplay, they just never got as much shine as Em. Masta Ace and Treach influenced Em’s style heavily. And there are other cats who paved the way for Em’s style:
        the Hieroglyphics, Mika 9, Twista, P. Monch, Gift of Gab (from Blackalicious), et al. Even Detroit’s Royce and Elzhi are insane with the bars. All these MCs are untouchable at what they do. It just comes down to whose style you favor. But again, none of these guys got the level of recognition Em did.

        And BTW, there are better freestylers than Eminem. Em lost rap battles to both Juice and Rhymefest, believe it or not.

        Not taking anything from Em. Just something to think about.

      • illynois95

        Lmao Myka 9. That cat is soooo off the radar I can’t believe you brought him up. His new album with Factor is a 10/10. Don’t see much of an influence on Em from his style though. I still find Em’s song structure/ writing style, and basically the whole presentation of his music is far beyond the level that anyone else has done. Like seriously lightyears ahead of them. And I say that as a huge underground/ old school hip hop head. Even MMLP2 sucked but had a few joints where his wordplay was untouchable.

      • Q.

        I mentioned Myka since you’re familiar with Project Blowed. I said those cats paved the way stylistically, not necessarily that Em sounds like them. Same as saying Rakim Allah paved the way for all advanced lyrical emcees, most notably influenced Nas, though we wouldn’t say Nas sounded like Rakim… See what I mean? And again, not taking anything away from Em, but he is not more sophisticated conceptually than a Black Thought or a Pharaohe Monch or a Nas, or a number of other emcees I can think of… e.g., Del’s “Deltron 3030” was one of the illest concept albums of all time, which displayed his insane vocab, rhyme ability and creativity. Del is a pioneer, But the average rap listener doesn’t know shit about Del. All of this is to say is that Eminem has enjoyed a greater platform to be recognized on than most other legendary wordsmiths.

      • illynois95

        He doesn’t often do concepts, but when he does I’d argue that he delivers better. Stan for instance, one of the best story/narrative tracks of all time. As far as platform, well yea he’s had a much bigger one than any underground cats, no debate there. It just blows me away that some heads refuse to give him his props, and is arguably BECAUSE he has benefited from such a big spotlight.

      • Q.

        I personally have no problem acknowledging Em’s genius. The reality is, Eminem has benefited more from being white and great than just being great. It’s the Elvis effect. When a white man can compete with a Black man in a Black man’s arena, white supporters come out in droves. Dre saw an opportunity to capitalize on a white super-rapper, and it worked out for all parties involved. You gotta understand why some people feel a certain type of way about that because Em gets rewarded by mostly white fans in a way many other great underground Black rappers have never been. It’s not Eminem’s fault, it’s not Dre’s fault, it just is what it is. It reflects more on the character of America than anything. But even Em knows the game, he knows he benefited extraordinarily from being white. Heads still respect him because he goes so hard, even if we don’t relate to most of his music. That’s what the brotha ursocalledgod is saying.

      • illynois95

        Fair enough. I still disagree with the point that he doesn’t have classics. I mean, I’m a hip hop head and still listen to a lot of his older stuff regularly. Plenty of people I know do as well, most of them not as keen on underground or old school stuff as I am, but still, replay value is what constitutes classic status, right?

      • Q.

        Yes, a classic to me is timeless music, first and foremost. Everyone has their own definitions of what a “classic” is, some use it too loosely. I never said Em didn’t have classics. I was just giving perspective on why some people say he’s overrated in terms of his greatness (not skill).

      • illynois95

        Greatness not skill? Lol call me a stan, but I may never be able to accept that Em is anything less than the greatest in all song writing categories. I think he deserved every fan he got, just that a lot of the underground cats deserved more than they ever received. Pharoahe Monch, Canibus, Ras Kass, K-Rino, and those types of ultra-lyrical guys. I will concede that his whiteness gave him a little bit of the upper hand over them as far as mainstream success, but not as much as it’s made out to be. I think there’s a lot more to having mass appeal, and Em just had a formula that worked which included the energy he conveyed, the emotion, the intense delivery, the content that people could relate to, the fact that his music was actually good AND catchy unlike some of those guys. I like every dude i mentioned, but some of their mainstream albums just weren’t good (like Canibus), or they were but they didn’t have the song that was able to cross-over cause they were too scientific for the mainstream radio (Pharoahe Monch and Ras Kass). I don’t think you can boil it down to just his whiteness, not saying that you were trying to, but I do see that a lot. I’m done fawning over Em though, good convo, keep listening to good music brother!

      • Q.

        Eminem is a very skilled lyricist, but I couldn’t say that he is a greater SONGWRITER than a Black Thought, a Nas, a Common, a Mos Def, or even Lauryn Hill, for example, all dope emcees who I consider to be great poets, beyond just being rappers. Greatness is something not easily defined. Whereas rap/rhyme skills are something more tangibly measured, what makes one a great artist or a GOAT emcee is often the emotional impact they have on their listeners. Rap skill alone is not the measure of greatness, unfortunately. If so, an artist like Twista could easily be considered Top 5 DOA. Massive popularity and album sales do not necessarily equate to greatness either. If so, Drake would be considered Top 5 all-time, easily. Now, we know Drake is not considered a GOAT emcee by the majority of traditional Hip-Hop fans. So, the question is, why do many fans not consider Eminem the GOAT emcee?
        The simple truth is, most of Eminem’s music does not broadly resonate with the Black Hip-Hop community. This does not mean Eminem does not have Black fans or admirers, because he does, this does not mean he isn’t great, because he is–but what it means is that he doesn’t top a lot of listeners’ GOAT lists because his content is perceived to NOT generally vibe with the Black cultural experience… This isn’t bad or good–it’s just the truth. His topics don’t often broach the broad scope of social issues which heavily impact the lives of people of color, such as racism, police brutality, the lopsided penal system, Black identity and history, or just simple things like Black cultural traditions, family or love. Eminem does rap about poverty, life in urban Detroit, and depression, and being an outsider/underdog which are topics I think a lot of Black listeners can relate to. But for the most part, Black listeners more readily identify and connect with an artist like Tupac, for example, than Eminem, because Pac covered most issues relating to Black people, and his persona and relevance to the community had a deep inspirational impact on a generation which carried to the next. This was in addition to him being immensely popular, being a good songwriter, and having had huge sales. This is the reason why you hear Tupac topping many people’s GOAT lists. I don’t think Eminem had a formula to his success. As an underground rapper, Em was extremely fortunate to get plugged into the huge platform that Dr. Dre provided. His lyrical shock value early on and the novelty of him being white was what garnered him a lot of attention. As [mostly] white fans flocked to him and supported his music, his celebrity exploded. I’m assuming his content over the years has resonated deeply with his core fans, especially as he’s become more introspective. Em owns the all-time sales records and is undoubtedly one of the greatest, but that doesn’t make him THE GOAT MC, from the broader point of view within Hip-Hop culture and relevance.

      • illynois95

        agree to disagree. I listen to all those guys and still think he’s the GOAT. I’m biased though because his music resonates with me more, so no hard feelings. I still stand by the fact that it was his formula more than his skin color, and like you said, 2pac had a similar formula but with different content, he also appealed to emotion and brought an intense delivery matched by few (But let’s be honest, his wordplay and lyrical skill was average at best, lol) and that’s why he also was a sales powerhouse. If being white automatically gives you the upperhand in a sales battle with similar emcees who were black then in theory Paul Wall should have outsold Mike Jones, Lil Wyte should have outsold Three 6, Mac MIller should have outsold Wiz Khalifa, and the labels would have started signing a bunch of other white dudes from the underground to capitalize on it, but they knew guys like Ill Bill, Cage, Esoteric, or Copywrite didn’t have the same formula for success as Em, they were lyrical and white, but lacked the mass appeal.

      • Q.

        You pretty much reinforced my points: Ill Bill, Cage, Esoteric, and Copywrite never got the platform that Em got to even attain a similar level of mass appeal. If one of them did…who knows? You mentioned Mac Miller vs. Wiz Khalifah. Mac Miller has done very well financially for an “underground” rapper, but for whatever reason, it seems like he’s opted not to take the crossover route like Wiz, which is why he’s not outselling him. I’m sure if Mac wanted to do a crossover single with the right producer, he could do Wiz numbers too…As far as Mike Jones, Lil Wyte, etc, those guys are nowhere near the GOAT realm and are forgettable. And I think Paul Wall is better than Mike Jones anyway–and Paul has done better than okay throughout his career. But the point I’m making really has nothing to do with record sales–I’m talking about the artist’s music and message resonating with listeners. You proved what I was saying exactly about greatness when you said 2pac’s technical skill was average, compared to emcees like Em and a bunch of others. I agree! But rhyme skill isn’t what made Pac great: it was his message, his heart and his persona that made people love him like he was their brother. He transcended music, and influenced the culture in many different ways. There’s no formula for those types of qualities; either you have them or you don’t. This is why a majority of Hip-Hop would never consider an Eminem greater than a Pac. And it’s funny, because Em was definitely inspired by Pac too. I don’t believe Eminem had a formula, other than him getting the break of a lifetime and going balls out–which was exactly what he was supposed to do. But he couldn’t have predicted his level of success. No way. But like you said, you feel Em more because he resonates with your experience, just like emcees like Common or Black Thought et al. resonate and reflect mine. So, who’s great is a matter of what’s most important to the listener.

      • illynois95

        I don’t think we are using the same definition of formula. Every emcee has a formula, i’m not saying it’s calculated by other people. And Em and Pac had similar formulas that helped them reach their audiences (emotion, intensity, controversy, etc). I agree that MOST hip hop listeners won’t put Em above Pac, but I still do personally, and think Pac dying in his prime helped his legacy. If he hadn’t died so early he probably wouldn’t be any more relevant to the younger generations than Redman or Dj Quik (exaggeration but you never know). Mac Miller has gone mainstream, done Ok but not as well as Wiz, and then started making stuff that sounds pretty underground the past 2 years but still on a major label. The Ill Bill, etc. argument, even with the platform would never sell near as much as Em did. Ill Bill raps about conspiracy theories which wouldn’t move units, Copywrite does battle raps and punchlines in his music, also not very marketable, Cage used to be like the Slim Shady persona but with less rapping ability, and Esoteric is just average hardcore east coast s—. I’m a fan of all of their music but don’t think any of them could have radio hits even if given the opportunity. Ill Bill and Apathy both had major label deals at one point and were unable to capitalize on them.

        I love the presentation of Common’s music (excluding UMC wtf was that albums purpuse?) especially the Kanye era, but often am turned off by all the afro-centric themes and, frankly, as a rapper I find him below average. I feel like he just gets all the best producers to make great music anyway (Kanye, Dilla, No ID). Hearing him along side Talib Kweli, Kanye, and any of those cats makes it apparent every time. If you’ve heard the song “Kingdom” from his most recent album then you know what I mean, Vince Staples demolished him on that song.

        As for Black Thought, the Roots are top 5 for me. Their whole catalog is amazing. He even ethered Pharoahe Monch on “Rapid Eye Movement”. That being said, he doesn’t really emotionally appeal to me, in fact I can’t think of a single time he has. I just appreciate his skill, which is severely underrated in my opinion, he is almost NEVER mentioned in the all time greatest lists.

      • Q.

        What you describe as “formula,” I would characterize more as style. Some artists are naturally more evocative than others, and may be taken as controversial, incidentally. I agree that Pac and Biggie dying young left more of an emotional impact on fans, which I believe lends people to overrate them. But I also believe the same happened with Eminem. Eminem won a huge flock of white fans and supporters who weren’t even interested in Hip-Hop prior to his major debut. Em had basically like the reverse of the “white flight” effect on rap. Regardless of how skilled Em is, certain white fans are going to champion him over hundreds of other fantastic non-white emcees no matter what, similar to how Elvis was revered. The difference between Elvis and Em, is that Em actually has respect for the roots of the culture he stepped into, acknowledges his predecessors, and is humble enough to realize his celebrity DOES have a large part to do with the novelty of him being white in a Black-dominated culture… It’s kinda like how some Millennials say that Kobe is the best basketball player ever, when clearly Jordan is GOAT. Younger kids grew up on Kobe and saw him dominate prior to Lebron and after Jordan retired, and believe Kobe’s the best because that’s all they know. But that’s being ignorant to history.

        Your bias really came through on your comments about Common and Black Thought. You said Common and P. Monch got demolished and ethered on their own tracks. LOL That’s a bit of a reach. And saying Common is below average is almost offensive–most Hip-Hop circles would look at you funny for that one. Common’s catalog speaks for itself, and he’s proven himself to be an elite emcee by his peers’ standards. Com has qualities that Em doesn’t have–for one, Com is a dope freestyler, much better than Eminem. But even Rhymefest and Juice out-freestyled Em in battles. Two, Com is one of the most poetic lyricists out there. A lot of his lyrics you could read from paper without music, and wouldn’t necessarily sound like raps. His metaphors have layers, and his wordplay is often subtle. He can also get busy with bars and is a great rhymer. So, I don’t understand how he could be sub-average. But above all, what he raps about is actually of substance and important to the Black community. Half of Eminem’s catalog is comedic shit, which is another reason more Black fans don’t take him seriously.

        You said Common’s too Afrocentric for you. That’s because you’re white and don’t relate to Black culture. Com honors his roots and history. I think it’s funny when people are offended by pro-Black rappers. Remember, Hip-Hop is part of Black culture. You have to remember, white people are really guests in Hip-Hop culture. Em knows this. Even Paul Wall said it. This music comes primarily from the Black experience. BTW, “Kingdom” was a message-driven song; Com wasn’t competing with Vince. Com is already battle-tested and battle-proven. He’s in a whole other space as an artist at this point in life…Did you consider that maybe Com featuring Vince on that song, was to let Vince shine? That’s usually how it works; the OGs open up the door for the up-and-comers to flaunt their A-Game. Kanye did it for Lupe on “Touch the Sky.” Black Thought did it for Beanie on “Adrenaline,” etc… You also said Com picks great producers like that’s a bad thing–no, that’s a SMART thing. More emcees should use that formula, at the very least…that’s pretty much what Jay-Z did his entire career. A great rapper over lame beats is almost a waste of talent, IMO. As far as Black Thought not appealing to you emotionally–that’s exactly how most Hip-Hop fans feel about Em! Thought’s song strengths lie in his poetics and imagery, in addition to his rhymes and metaphors. To me, he is the consummate MC. He can do just about anything on a mic. But there are so many nuances to the best emcees, if you rate them by a narrow scope of criteria, then you can miss other qualities which make them truly great. Last but not least, as long as Hip-Hop is created by Black people, Em will never be the GOAT. Why? Not because Black fans don’t appreciate Em, it’s because he’s simply not as relevant to our experience as other greats. Being a great emcee/artist is not just limited to rhyme schemes and punchlines.

      • illynois95

        I was going to ask for examples of some of your statements to get educated about stuff that may have gone over my head, but saying white people are guests in hip hop is downright idiotic so I am done here. The implication that white people are somehow less qualified to partake in an activity because they didn’t invent it is racist and offensive. If that logic were applied to everything then Jordan wouldn’t be the GOAT, Obama couldn’t be President, Tiger Woods couldn’t be considered one of the best golfers ever, so on and so forth. Let me guess, having double standards is okay because of slavery, right? GTFOH. So Chief Keef is more qualified to be GOAT than Aesop Rock? I’d be equally offended if a white person made that assertion about blacks doing country music or orchestra and don’t act like that would be okay to you. What a disgusting outlook you have.

      • Q.

        What a disgusting outlook I have. LOL! That’s the emotional response I’d expect from a white guy who simply doesn’t get it…I’m not mad at you though. I get it that you don’t get it.…or maybe, you don’t want to get it. I only told you the TRUTH, whether you accept it or not, is up to you. And the examples you made aren’t really legitimate, because the game of basketball was predated by a similar game created by the Mayans (non-whites), the first inhabitants and rulers of this nation were non-white, country music is derived from blues, which is also traditional American Black music, and classical music was not really invented by so-called whites either; the piano comes from the harp, which was a West African instrument. In fact, very little, culturally, on this Earth was originated by so-called white people, but all that’s besides the issue… The point I made was simple, white folks are GUESTS within this culture we call Hip-Hop. It does not mean white people are not “qualified” to participate, or unwelcome. There is no qualification other than the will to do it. But outsiders must respect the origins and cultural relevance of who created Hip-Hop, who it speaks to, and who it was primarily created to represent: mostly impoverished people of color who were socially marginalized and and had little outlet to voice their perspective in a RACIST American society. This also, means you must respect the opinions of those same people when it comes to the Culture. If I was to take board in your family’s home, live with you, eat with you, even do chores to help out, that doesn’t give me the right to lead your household, right? So, you declaring that Eminem is greater than everybody else just because YOU like him the most isn’t really valid. That’s what actually sounds idiotic. That’s just your MINORITY opinion, not a matter of fact. I have given you a pretty thorough explanation as to why Eminem is not considered the greatest emcee most Hip-Hop fans, more than most people would have the patience to do. Do with that information as you may, but you can never say you never heard why.

      • illynois95

        And you declaring that no white person can be even considered in the GOAT conversation is disgusting racist logic, and if the average hip hop fan sees it this way, it explains why I’m often having to defend the culture and music when discussing it with people who don’t listen to it, people who characterize it as stupid. Because the majority of it’s fans think like that. The highest platform of any medium of expression must be held by a person of the same race as the person who invented said medium. OR does that only apply when it’s something that black people invented? I didn’t say the Mayan game, I said basketball. I didn’t say blues, I said country. I didn’t say the harp, I said orchestra. You are just playing semantics now to discredit any white accomplishment. To think I was having an enjoyable conversation with you before you displayed your repulsive bigotry.

      • Q.

        Now, I’m a repulsive bigot. LOL Trust me when I say those words mean nothing to me. Just more emotional blabber which has nothing to do with the facts I gave you.

        Europeans did not invent the orchestral concept, Country music is derived from Blues, and the Mayan game was the predecessor to basketball. These aren’t semantics, they’re HISTORICAL FACTS. You are trying to attribute cultural ownership to a particular group of people, without acknowledging true cultural origin. Just as you accuse me of being a “racist” (laughable) , I can just as easily say you are one for trying to discredit the value of other emcees due to your blind allegiance to your favorite white rapper. But that would be silly. I understand that racism is a system of CONTROL, not an emotional disposition.
        You’ve twisted my words, as people often do when they get emotional. I didn’t declare anything. I EXPLAINED to you why many people feel the way they do about Eminem in terms of his greatness/relevance to their experience. You’ve conflated your adulation for Eminem’s rapping skills with what it means to be considered a great artist. The two are not the same. You are only but one fan in a sea of millions. I don’t see why you think your opinion is more valid than the majority of other fans. I will give you credit at least for being somewhat aware of a diverse range of Hip-Hop artists, though you showed your own cultural bias when you said about Eminem:

        “I’m biased though because his music resonates with me more…”

        and the remarks you made about Common:

        “but [I] often am turned off by all the afro-centric themes and, frankly, as a rapper I find him below average…”

        Now, I could easily construe your remarks as “repulsive bigotry,” but I won’t. I just chalk it up as your opinion from your own cultural perspective, but not as LAW. My initial comment to you was to offer clarification, not debate. Whether you acknowledge the reality of what I’m saying or not is not my issue. I just gave you the truth.

      • illynois95

        YOU are the one assigning cultural ownsership of an activity, and while you expressed respect for Em’s skill you said that nonetheless he was automatically disqualified from achieving the highest level of respect due to his race. That is bigoted, no matter what excuses you have. I was not assigning cultural ownership of anything, I was using counterexamples of why that logic is appallingly stupid. White people are every bit as qualified to take part in hip hop as black people, they should respect its foundations but have no obligation to do it a certain way just because of who invented it. I also never took anything away from Common’s music but gave my own reasons for why some of his content doesn’t particularly move me, which you were doing throughout the entire conversation with Em’s music. I stand by my assertion that Common’s technical abilities are sub par, and he lacks charisma, and it was generally Dilla and Kanye who carried his music, at which point you got offended and acted like I attacked Common for choosing good producers, which if anything I said was the best part of his music. You are part of the problem with why cultures are divided in this country, acting like if a white person does something that is traditionally black that they need to pay more homage than black people who do it. They aren’t “guests”, and any idea otherwise is bigotry, and only someone not interested in racial harmony would act like one culture should own the rights to participate in something more than someone else. I gave my opinion and presented it as my own personal opinion that nobody had to accept this whole time, YOU said what all hip hop heads had to believe about race and culture. Peace out.

      • Q.

        I could easily construe your remarks as “repulsive bigotry,” but I won’t. I just chalk it up as your opinion from your own cultural perspective, but not as LAW. My initial comment to you was to offer clarification, not debate. Whether you acknowledge the reality or not is not my issue. I just told you the truth.

        There you went again putting all types of words in my mouth. Where did I say “Eminem was automatically disqualified from achieving the highest level of respect?” I’ll wait for you to pull the quote…
        You think I’m the reason cultures are divided in this country? WRONG. Racism/white supremacy is the reason cultures are divided in this country. Do you know what RACISM is exactly? Do you know how and why Hip-Hop was started in the first place?? To people like you, this is just entertainment, to us this is LIFE. I have no excuses, don’t need any. I gave you clarification, that’s it. You can be as butthurt as you want about it, means little to me. I gave you respectful dialogue, but make no mistake, I’m not here to coddle your emotions or to be politically correct. Truth is above everything. And again, you’re talking about qualifications. QUALIFICATIONS FOR WHAT? This is not about a job or an ACTIVITY, this is about CULTURE. If you are not from this Culture, you are a spectator. You cannot claim to be in the true spirit of Hip-Hop without acknowledging what is the purpose and origin of Hip-Hop in the first place. You can rhyme words until you’re blue in the face, but that has nothing to do one’s understanding of the Black experience in America. White and many Black people alike are highly uneducated and ignorant about what this Culture is about, which is why we have fvcking idiots like Iggy Azalea and Stitches running around feeling entitled to respect and recognition that they don’t deserve. You need to get together with them and work out your issues. And yes, you are visitors to Black culture. Even Paul Wall is humble enough to admit that. Look up his interview on YouTube. If you disagree, send him some hatemail. And after you finish watching that, look up some interviews by Tim Wise, so you can get a better understanding of what cultural appropriation is. SALAAM

      • illynois95

        You can be a redneck country boy making rap music and it’s no less hip hop than a black person in the inner city doing it. Any American is as entitled to put their own style into the music and it can be considered hip hop as long as it categorically is defined as such. Vinnie Paz, Ill Bill, and Madchild are heavy metal and biker gang dudes, but still make rap over hip hop beats and therefore are part of hip hop culture, Yelawolf is from a hick town in Alabama and the same goes for him. Idiots like Iggy Azalea and Stitches? While I’m not a fan of their music whatsoever, that doesn’t mean that they deserve less respect than, say, Nicki Minaj or Chief Keef. Any rapper should have respect for the founders of the culture and music that they represent, but to suggest that white people have MORE of an obligation than black or Hispanic people IS, by definition, discriminatory. White people are Visitors to black culture, obviously. Black culture and hip hop culture are not one in the same. What you said about whites being visitors implies that they are less qualified to participate, and that is racism. Do I know what racism is exactly? Quick Google search for an exact definition returns: “prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one’s own race is superior.” This was definition #2, which pertained to this situation more because the first one was more about people who generally dislike/hate members of other races. Maybe I did take your ignorant comments a little personally at first, but you were the first to show any signs of “butthurt” when I said what I said about Common, you appeared passively annoyed that I didn’t put him on a pedestal (which was only for one category, wordplay, in the first place, I’m still a fan of his music). So you went from that to “white people are visitors in hip hop”, which is blatant racism. If anyone is a visitor to me it’s the non-lyrical idiots with no appreciation for the artform and culture (including its foundations) like Soulja Boy, Slim Jesus, Waka Flocka etc., while the true masters are the people who put their heart and soul into their craft like Talib Kweli, Brother Ali, Sage Francis, Nas, Ras Kass, Del, etc. I had no divisive intentions, but apparently you did.

        Here’s the ignorant quote you asked for: “Last but not least, as long as Hip-Hop is created by Black people, Em will never be the GOAT”. How am I supposed to interpret that other than how I put it in my last comment? GOAT is subjective, and I said who mine was. The only dispute I made was to the other guy who said he didn’t have classics, which you’ve conceded in this conversation that he does, so I’ve been trying to figure out what you were debating in the first place because until you showed your bigoted colors we seemed to agree on just about everything other than who our favorite was.

        Oh yea and you said you COULD choose to interpret certain things I said as cultural bias. “i’m biased because his music resonates with me more”. and “I’m often turned off by the afro-centric themes”. By what ridiculous stretch of the imagination could that be interpreted as any type of cultural bias? One was me basically admitting my (by my own admission Stan-ish) admiration of Em’s music, nowhere did I say that anyone of any other race was incapable of making music that moved me, some black guys resonate emotionally more than some white guys (Tech n9ne for instance is deeper than Prof, but I’m a fan of each for different reasons). The other was me saying what you had been saying about Em the whole time, about Common, except I never said that it had to be that way because I’m white, just my own opinion about some of the things I’ve heard from him. Plus there are exceptions, I ride around in my car rapping “Who shot Biggie smalls, If we don’t get them they gon’ get us all/ I’m down for running up on them cr-ckers in they city hall”. I don’t mind appreciating art with viewpoints of someone with a much different outlook than myself, and often do so with Common but said that his content was not as personal to me as some others are. You’d have to be looking for bigotry to find it in what I said.

      • Q.

        I never said Hip-Hop culture and Black culture are one and the same. However, Hip-Hop culture is inextricable from Black culture. If you had read carefully, you would have seen that I said Hip-Hop is a part of Black culture. From the beginning, Black people have ALLOWED whites to come into the inner circles of Hip-Hop. You probably didn’t know that this thing started from Black and Latin New York street gangs. How do you think white kids could just suddenly walk into that arena, unless they were allowed in? You don’t just walk into another man’s house uninvited–you’d get killed. Like I said, Hip-Hop Culture welcomes all people, but don’t dismiss the roots and act like the Black experience is irrelevant. The whole concept of Hip-Hop was a consequence of American RACISM and class-based DISCRIMINATION. Just because a person rhymes some words together over a beat doesn’t mean they are Hip-Hop. Hip-Hop reflects a certain social consciousness and awareness. Any azzhole can rap or spin a record, that doesn’t mean they represent this culture. Yet, you have thousands of people who perpetrate and exploit the artforms without paying homage to the spirit of the movement. Hip-Hop has been diluted by these types of people, white, Black, and otherwise.

        Thank you for quoting me. When I said “Last but not least, as long as Hip-Hop is created by Black people, Em will never be the GOAT.” Yes, that is my OPINION based on the fact that people relate to what they know, as I pointed out earlier. You yourself said “I’m biased though because his music resonates with me more…” and with your bias as a white guy you relate to Eminem experientally, don’t you? You stated yourself, being a GOAT is subjective. So what makes you think Black fans would someday suddenly relate to Eminem and crown him as their GOAT over their favorite Black emcees whom they better relate to? If you think my opinion is incorrect, then poll about a hundred Black die-hard Hip-Hop music fans, ask them who the GOAT emcee is, and see how many pick Eminem.

        You said, “‘white people are visitors in hip hop”, which is blatant racism'”

        Yet, you also agreed with me by saying “White people are Visitors to black culture, obviously.”

        So, am I a “racist” or are you just confused? You contradicted yourself. So, either you understand what I’m saying, or you are just in denial. Standard definitions of “racism” tend to be lacking, as they offer no context in relation to global social dominance by white Europeans. The truth is, there was no “racism” prior to Europeans, because the idea of “race” didn’t exist. This idea of race is a relatively new concept devised by Europeans as a means of control. Let me give you a more comprehensive idea of that racism is:

        Racism IS a social mechanism which establishes and reinforces tangible and intangible cultural and economic dominance of one group over another group or groups based on the pretext of color-based social stratification. Therefore, a racist is one who willingly and actively supports such a system, or who passively enjoys its privileges and benefits. Racism was devised by European whites to benefit whites in a multi-racial social paradigm commonly known as White Supremacy. By the very nature of the system itself, a person who is not a benefactor in such a system CANNOT be a racist in said system.

        Your comments about me looking for bigotry are also wrong. Your bias in relation to Eminem’s music is cultural, isn’t it? You relate to him more as a white man than the experiences of Black men in America, don’t you? The average Black men I know, myself included, do not relate to a lot of Eminem’s subject matter. If you’ve never been on the receiving end of racism, how could you identify with those topics and themes by Black artists? The best you could do is try to understand them, but if you’ve never experienced them firsthand, you couldn’t identify. Those were statements of fact, yet you chose to be offended by them. Why is that?

        As far as Common, I gave my opinion on his work, just like you gave yours. Why would you mention being “turned off by the afro-centric themes” unless those themes offended you or bothered you? And why would you be offended or bothered by someone honoring their own heritage? Explain.

      • illynois95

        Lmfao. What black person made up that new definition of racism just to justify being against racism AND being against white people? That’s a new one for me, but you jumped into that definition like it was your dogma. Show me a source for that definition that isn’t just some article by a left wing pundit with an agenda. That is not and never has been what racism is. Buy a dictionary. I’m done arguing with an obvious bigot.

        As for being “offended” by Common, I just gave you an example of lyrics that should offend me a lot more if that were the case, but its not. Why bring up em’s “comedic sh–” if you aren’t offended by it.

      • Q.

        I’m glad that definition was funny to you. It only reinforces my argument. If you disagree with that definition, then please explain the function of white supremacy to me. And where do you think definitions in the dictionary come from?

        So no explanation for your issues with “Afrocentric themes?” LOL Okay.

        I brought up Eminem’s “comedic sh!t” to demonstrate that his earlier catalog lacked the substance that many other emcees brought to the table. Most of his music is socially irrelevant to Black people.

      • illynois95

        OK, I said I was going to stop answering but, screw it, this conversation has gotten interesting to me. My explanation that you requested it that I don’t need an explanation because I don’t have “issues” with them. They just don’t appeal to me, like you say Em doesn’t appeal to you. I tolerate way more aggressive anti-white rhetoric from the likes of Dead Prez, Ras Kass, Talib Kweli, and plenty of others, and in fact enjoy the anti-establishment passion in their music, despite not agreeing with the politics of their music in real life. Nevertheless I respect that they present their principles with powerful sentiment through their art, and enjoy listening to it. Common too, but to a lesser degree. All that could be taken away from what I said was that it doesn’t appeal to me, not that I had a problem with him making the music he made. Like it or not, his technical ability IS weaker than Em’s but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have his strengths that others might find more important when assessing who their favorites are, but wordplay is one of my personal biggest criteria, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Common’s overall catalog and consistency is DEFINITELY >>> Eminems. Em has three classics albums at MOST, even to me. Common at at LEAST four. And don’t get me wrong, I listen to “BE” regularly, but still hold that the production carried the album more than anything. This conversation alone has made me realize that I stopped listening to Nobody’s Smiling after only a few listens and need to go back and absorb it more than I did at the time. All that being said, I remain infinitely blown away by Em’s lyrical ability, even on his recent albums that had commercial production that I wouldn’t listen to if it were anyone else rapping over it. Even on those albums I found his wordplay impeccable, which made it listenable despite the obvious selling out from his hardcore hip hop origins. I hope that clarified my position to you, and i hope you can put your bias aside. If hip hop was created to fight injustice and prejudice, then it should be about bringing cultures together. That will not be possible if there is a reluctance to let white people fully embrace it. One should not be obligated to have one set of beliefs or experiences to be a part of a musical culture. I know how it started, and respect it’s foundations, and dislike ANY artist who doesn’t have that respect. That includes Stitches, and also Chief Keef, and don’t think Chief Keef should be given a pass but Stitches shouldn’t. The musical culture’s ability to unite racial and class cultures (which I’ve personally witnessed in my town) should be embraced, and that double standard is counterproductive to that means.

        Not sure what you are asking about the function of white supremacy. I’m against all bigoted agendas, including white power, black power, Christian fundamentalism, Muslim fundamentalism, anti- Semitism, corporate greed, militant occupation of Third World nations, and people who call for cop killing.

      • Q.

        Thanks for responding. I appreciate your comments. I’ll say this–the only problem I had with this exchange was you accusing me of being racist and a bigot, which is inaccurate. Now, I can admit to having a bias in favor of my favorite emcees, like anyone else, including yourself. All biases aren’t necessarily good or bad. For instance, one could have a bias for Southern cuisine over Italian, puppies over kittens, etc. But this whole time you’ve been assuming that I’m against Eminem. I’m not. As I said earlier, the point of my initial comment was to help give you some clarity as to why certain fans do not consider Eminem their GOAT, in light of your debate with ursocalledgod. Not only do many fans not consider Em the GOAT, some people don’t even include him in their Top 10. The opinions I gave were reflective of the general consensus among Black rap fans, based on what I’ve been hearing people say over the past years. I’ve heard pretty much every argument for and against Em in terms of his greatness as a Hip-Hop artist. I tend to stay away from those debates, as people tend to quickly get emotional on either side. If you noticed, I never said who my personal GOAT emcee was. I mentioned certain emcees that I think are as good if not greater than Em in certain respects, but I never personally excluded Em from the GOAT list. In fact, a few weeks ago when Billboard put out its all-time list, I was having a similar discussion here, and I included Eminem in MY top all-time greatest MCs. I differ from the typical fan–as I was telling someone else, most of the time when people put theses lists together they’re just listing their personal favorites. I very rarely hear people rate emcees on any objective criteria. So, pretty much everybody’s lists are biased! I see New York cats only list emcees from New York, and for years I’ve heard people regurgitate Biggie and 2Pac, or even Big Pun or Big L–that’s the “late, great” effect you were talking about. Most people’s standards are superficial, and in my opinion, people don’t appreciate the unsung greats right in front of them. So, no, I don’t believe that white people can’t embrace Hip-Hop culture, because I know many have, and yes, I know Hip-Hop does have the power to unite cultures in a positive way. And if you’ve ever seen my comments on this site, you would see that I criticize acts like Chief Keef all the time.

        As far as racism/white supremacy, we understand that we currently live in a global system of color-based discrimination which generally places whites and lighter-complected individuals at the top of the pyramid of privilege and access. My point was, while the average dictionary gives a basic definition of racism, it doesn’t address it in a practical historical context. That was why I gave a more practical definition of the current system we’re living in…So I asked you, if you disagree with that definition, then how would you personally define the color-based paradigm currently in place? And before you get offended again, no, I do not believe all white people are racists/white supremacists. The majority of white folks are exploited as pawns to maintain this system, just as people of color are, and particularly the poor, who make up the vast majority of planet Earth.

      • illynois95

        well imagine if someone told you that despite Tiger Woods’ obviously impeccable talent, he can’t be on the GOAT list due to his race (I know the metaphor isn’t perfect because athletics and art are judged by completely different aesthetic criteria, but bear with me). That would sound outlandish to you, right? It’s f—ing stupid. I don’t take you as a big golf fan, so imagine if that scenario were about something you were a HUGE fan of, one of your biggest hobbies. So yea I took it a little personal. And I was never arguing for you to rethink your GOAT, just gave reasons for why I picked mine and disagreed that race was the only reason he blew up. Never was under the impression that you were against him either, I didn’t even know what we were debating at first.

        As far as racism… you probably don’t wanna go down that rabbit hole with me. But I like the fact that you acknowledge that whites and blacks are both being manipulated by the powerful. That’s what I say all the time.

      • Q.

        You mistook my point about Em as me saying that he is incapable of being considered great–that’s not what I meant. I meant that I believe he will most likely never be considered the singular greatest emcee by most of non-white Hip-Hop fans in particular. That’s my current opinion, based on the evidence of what I’ve heard and read so many fans say over the years until now. To me, what defines greatness as an MC encompasses more than just raw rapping proficiency. Remember, earlier I wrote:

        “Whereas rap/rhyme skills are something more tangibly measured, what makes one a great artist or a GOAT emcee is often the emotional impact they have on their listeners.”

        As with the case with 2Pac, for example, “great” is not necessarily synonymous with “best.” I think there are other factors to consider outside of sheer popularity and album sales. And I have yet to see anyone lay out any kind of objective criteria to pare down a Top 10 list.

      • Q.

        There you went again putting all types of words in my mouth. Where did I say “Eminem was automatically disqualified from achieving the highest level of respect?” I’ll wait for you to pull the quote…
        You think I’m the reason cultures are divided in this country? WRONG. Racism/white supremacy is the reason cultures are divided in this country. Do you know what RACISM is exactly? Do you know how and why Hip-Hop was started in the first place?? To people like you, this is just entertainment, to us this is LIFE. I have no excuses, don’t need any. I gave you clarification, that’s it. You can be as butthurt as you want about it, means little to me. I gave you respectful dialogue, but make no mistake, I’m not here to coddle your emotions or to be politically correct. Truth is above everything. And again, you’re talking about qualifications. QUALIFICATIONS FOR WHAT? This is not about a job or an ACTIVITY, this is about CULTURE. If you are not from this Culture, you are a spectator. You cannot claim to be in the true spirit of Hip-Hop without acknowledging what is the purpose and origin of Hip-Hop in the first place. You can rhyme words until you’re blue in the face, but that has nothing to do one’s understanding of the Black experience in America. White and many Black people alike are highly uneducated and ignorant about what this Culture is about, which is why we have fvcking idiots like Iggy Azalea and Stitches running around feeling entitled to respect and recognition that they don’t deserve. You need to get together with them and work out your issues. And yes, you are visitors to Black culture. Even Paul Wall is humble enough to admit that. Look up his interview on YouTube. If you disagree, send him some hatemail. And after you finish watching that, look up some interviews by Tim Wise, so you can get a better understanding of what cultural appropriation is. SALAAM

      • ursocalledgod

        Oh I forgot to throw ” rap god” I’m there LMAO yeah those are some CLASSIC hip hop joints right there…FOH

      • If there’s one rapper that is “universally recognized” it’s M.

      • ursocalledgod

        not for his classics. because of who he is. we are talking about MUSIC not bars, ciphers, freestyles. ems music is corny dude. unless your a suburbanite or a college or high school white boy.

      • He may be corny to you but Millions of people bought his album . . . correction 10’s of millions of people purchased his albums. I am not a fan of his new stuff myself but his earlier material was crazy EVERYONE was caught off guard by his skill. The top 10 rappers on any list have him on their top 10 list, his influence is still seen in the battle rap scene today. His first album was a classic to many people, so to answer your question about where are his classics? At least check his first two albums after those two then we may have to look a little deeper but he has his classics and has stamped his name in the books.

      • ursocalledgod

        I hear you and he definitely sold millions but sales don’t make you a credible emcee. atleast not to the real hip hop heads. Justin bieber and taylor swift sell millions and would you consider that bubble gum shyt they do as credible musicians or atists material? that marsall mathers lp was dope and you could rock it all the way through but not one classic for the streets and the hoods where this music lives and breathes and was born from. that’s what I mean by classic. you can STILL hear joints by nas, jay, pac, biggie, the wu, the lox etc. when is the last time you heard someone rocking ANY of ems shyt?

      • Well I give you credit and agree 1000% that sales don’t mean shtt… and you may be right and wrong at the same time, when im in the hood I don’t think I see no one really digging through the crates for M but when it comes on he gets proper love . . . I guess you can say he connects more with a different side of the culture but at the core of the art which we call HIP HOP he embodies it skill, flow, story telling, etc . . . he just doesn’t have that called uncalled “hood” hit but he gets his proper love when he comes on and dudes start a similar convo as to the one we’re having right now… who’s the best Mc biggie, jay-z, nas, m, pun etc…

      • ursocalledgod

        Chuuuch…

      • Good convo homey, stay up!

      • ursocalledgod

        No doubt. Do the same.

      • golder1

        Em get a lot of respect from his peers and to me that speaks more than any hood nigga not accepting him. Em new music has not been up to par but his earlier work is worthy. Em is on Nas top ten list. Em wrote and performed on pleny on songs off that Chronic 2000 that will bag today. His Marshall Mathers EP has songs you could listen to today. EM will never get totally respect from hood because that isnt what he represents and most people from hood dont relate to his lyrical content. But when he is able to get the respect of his peers that says a lot. EM is not the best but its not disrespectful for him to be part of the conversation

      • ursocalledgod

        Never said it was disrespect-able for him to be in the conversation just can not understand it. Artists respect him because of his skill not his music that’s different than a from a fan of hip hop perspective. I understand the streets can’t relate to the corny shyt he raps about that’s my whole point. How is ranked with Nas, Jay, pac, Big, Kendrick, Cole etc? This hip hop started in the hoods and that’s what makes you credible in my eyes is when the streets embrace your music. Now if you said he’s a top ten pop artist I wouldn’t have a problem with that.

      • golder1

        Skill out way all that shit. That is why he is respected by his peers. His music isnt corny just not relatable to the hood. And a lot of artist enjoy his music as well as his skills. Noone can deny his word play is top notch. The hood doesnt embrace Talib Kweli or Phoroah or Black Thought but they are all great lyricist, does that mean they are not. The streets are not alwasy right. And Ems music is far from Pop. Em is the white Brotha Lynch same style and content

      • ursocalledgod

        Lmao I don’t know what hood you from but all them emcees you named are respected. Black thought is in my top 5 bruh. Don’t confuse the hood with the thugs and the ignorant. Saying em is comparable to lynch? LMAO FOH maybe when he first started but that went away QUICK. Lynch is still spitting the same way and the same content. Now if you sit here and tell me em is you’re playing yourself. Even when he was spitting like lynch it was more comedic, Lynch was anything BUT. Let me make it more clear…when I say hood I’m saying the purists of hip hop and hardcore hip hop. Maybe hood clouded what I was trying to say, but every hood I’ve been in and around that’s what is respected so I went with that.

      • golder1

        You can go to any good and those names will not be ones people say as some of the best. And moving the crowd is more about the beats not the lyrics. Even Hip Hop purist can easily see Em word play is top notch. And Em style is like Lynch, they both have content this is not really accept by many. Em still has the same flow but his choice of beats are different than before but his lyrical content is pretty much the same.Lynch is lyrically one of the best but will never get put on a list because of his content. Same as Em. Hardcore Hip Hop fans concentrate on lyrics and word play, just because a song is banging and moves the crowd doesn’t man that they are lyrically great as well. Em stays in his lane and doesn’t trybto make hood bangers because that isn’t who he is and wouldn’t be the respected if he tries D to jump in that lane. People might not be bumping his music in the hood but I bet they respected his flow.

      • ursocalledgod

        When I say hood or the streets im talking about the house parties, the parks, the ciphers, the backyard bbqs, the cabs, underground hip hop spots, etc I’ve been to A lot in A lot of different cities and I have NEVER heard ems shit banging and moving the crowd. So that’s why I say what I say. That’s the ESSENCE of this shyt.

      • Q.

        Also strong points.

      • Q.

        Good argument.

  • MrNoName2K

    Its always someone who shouldn’t be talking thats always saying something. He’s right there in the same category as that Vince Staples n*gga talking about the 90’s was “overrated”..smh..lil n*ggas these days stay losing

  • DIPSET

    he might be right but in a hip hop beef he don’t want them problems.

    • ursocalledgod

      stop it bruh. Earl aint no hoe when it comes to them barz and he actually makes songs niggaz and hip heads alike can ride to. em is nasty when hes in a cipher etc but as far as songs go his shyt is corny. too many bitches singing pop song etc just cornball shyt. niggaz cant ride to that shyt. this coming from a nigga out the D eastside born and raised. we don’t even rock his shyt and hes from Michigan.

  • ursocalledgod

    im with dude. ive been saying this from day 1. every since the marshall mathers lp dude has been azz. im tired of so many people dic handling when it comes to em. now granted its mostly white boys which is understandable but when I hear a fellow hip hop head calling this dude on of the best GTFOH. to be considered in that prestigious group you have to have some CLASSICS. name ONE classic song that is considered a banger to the point still bang it to this day. name one song that the streets fux with. show me one credible hip hop top ten list where one of his songs are on it. I don’t want to hear that bullshyt about how many records hes sold or sales. this shyt started in the streets if the streets don’t respect you than that’s all you are is an entertainer. hell taylor swift and Justin bieber sell millions and theyre both AZZ hell even fetty wep had a few hits in the top 40 so that shyt means nothing to the streets, the block, the hood, that’s where the shyt lives and breathes.

    • Brindle

      this is hiphop, not just rap… the reason Em is respected in the streets by those of us who have never bought his tapes, played his music in our cars or our house parties is cause brotha’s don’t vibe off his shit, they vibe off him as an Emcee cause of his freestyle, worldplay and battles… if you from the 90’s you remember the white boy ripping the mic on the Wake Up Show with Sway and Tech and being able to handle any Emcee that showed up with him, the week before or the week after, Royce, Crooked I, Chino XL, Raz Kass, hieroglyphics, Planet Asia, Pac, Biggie, Nas, etc… So one of the top 5, nahhh… but deserving respect, yeah… most street cats that give Em respect don’t know if his albums got better or worse cause we never listened to it in the 1st place… we respect his abilities live on the mic and if you a true head, especially that heard/saw it taking place during the 90’s, you gotta respect the kid

      • ursocalledgod

        No doubt. The man is due his respect. Like I said his ciphers, freestyles, are some of the ILLEST but his music just don’t hit with me. You nailed it tho bro.

      • I COULD’VE BEEN YA FATHER!

        dam you really broke down how real cats like myself look at eminem. im willing to bet you was born in 83??? anyway real ninja salute!

    • chambanaT

      Your right about him not having some real bangers but I feel hes part of that upper echelon because that boy can rap circles around about 90% of your favorite mc’s. Just sayin he one of the best who ever did as far as spittin.

  • Isa Ibn Maryam

    In my opinion Doris and Soul Tape 3 was two of the best hip hop projects that dropped that calendar year.

  • JerZeBoy

    this dudes music sux so who is he to make a comment? I like young thug more then this dude……..

    • KashIsKlay

      wow

  • timwest1000

    The bigger you pump them up to be, the harder they fall.

  • DrakeDoesn’tWrite

    Doris had Chum, Whoa and that banger with Vince Staples. It was alright.

  • Q.

    “If you still follow Eminem, you drink way too much Mountain Dew and probably need to like, come home from the army.”

    ^Can’t front. That was kinda FUNNY…Still don’t know sh!t about Earl Sweatpants’ music.

    • illynois95

      I don’t understand what he meant. Mountain Dew and the Army?

      Check his latest album it was pretty good actually.

      • Q.

        i.e., rednecks drink Mountain Dew a lot, and whiteboys in the military are removed from current music and [probably] keep Em in their playlists for inspiration/motivation.

        I know Earl got skills–I just have a hard time taking OF dudes seriously.

      • illynois95

        I used to feel the same way. What first changed my mind was Domo Genesis mixtape with Alchemist called “No Idols”. After that I checked out Tyler the Creator’s full discography, which is actually extremely dope. So far those two and Earl are the only ones I’ve really dug into. But it was worth it, they are one of my favorite crews out right now, along with Pro Era, TDE, and Slaughterhouse.

  • MAN FU*** THE INDUSTRY, I CAN’T STAND THEM MUTHAFU****** !!!

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