Tobacco Company Ordered To Stop Using Hip-Hop To Market Cigarettes

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. will dump a

marketing campaign that utilized Hip-Hop to promote their Kool Brand of cigarettes.

Critics claimed that the campaign was aimed at

luring black youth into smoking the cigarettes and that the campaign violated

a legal settlement the tobacco company reached with 46 states.

Maine Attorney General Steven Rowe, who is in

charge of enforcing the settlement, ordered Brown & Williamson to halt the

campaign, which bars tobacco companies from targeting teens using advertising

or marketing.

A recent letter to Rowe, a Brown & Williamson

attorney said the company will no longer package the cigarettes using rappers,

DJ’s and dancers to sell the Kool brand.

Kool was promoting the brand using the "Kool

Mixx 2004," labeled by the company as the "largest and most prestigious

DJ competition anywhere." Kool Mixx ran for six years and was a coast-to-coast

DJ battle.

This year was the first time they included an

MC competition.

"Kool understands the vibrant urban world

of the trendsetting, multicultural smoker," said Ludo Cremers, divisional

vice president, brand marketing in a press release after the competition was

announced. "Kool is the menthol authority. At the same time, Kool keeps

it real and remains linked to the latest urban trends. We’ll showcase these

trends this year through Kool Mixx and other promotions and events."

The company also released special edition thematic

cigarette packs and an interactive CD-Rom.

Activists also want the remaining Kool special

promotional items that are still in stores pulled.

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