Kurtis Blow Working On “History Of Rap” Documentary

Hip-Hop pioneer

Kurtis Blow is working on a documentary, "The History of Rap," focusing

on the origins of Hip-Hop, aimed at educating eager fans about the early days

of the genre.

Similar to the

VH1 special "And You Don’t Stop," Blow promises that his two-hour

documentary will delve deeper into the subject, with the histories of such luminaries

as Afrika Bambaataa, Grandmaster Flash, Hollywood, Eddie Cheeba, Luv Bug Starski

and others.

"We

really get into it," Blow told AllHipHop.com. "We give you a half-hour

on just Kool Herc. We start around 1972 all the way up to the early days of

RUN-DMC. The story really needs to be told about how Kurtis Blow was inspired,

how the Sugarhill Gang and RUN-DMC were inspired by these earlier cats that

never got the props they deserve. These are the guys who are the true pioneers."

Blow hopes the

documentary will enlighten people to the lesser known facts, like the oft-overlooked

fact that hip-hop was heavily influenced by disco music.

"A lot of

people don’t know about that," Blow continued. "Hip-hop came from

disco, it was a mutation of disco."

Blow, who also

serves as a DJ and emcee every Thursday from 6-9pm at the Greater Hood Memorial

AME Zion Church in Harlem, New York, aims for the documentary to be ready by

Summer 2005.

Aside from “The

History of Rap,” Blow has reportedly undertaken other business with a

former manager, but he declined to discuss an alleged lawsuit against mogul

Russell Simmons, who once guided his career.

He had more affectionate

comments for the emerging generation of rap legends.

Blow, who was the

first rapper to sign with a major label, the first to have a certified gold

single and the first to embark on an international concert tour, explained that

he did not have the bitter sentiments towards the younger hip-hoppers that many

old school rappers are accused of harboring.

"A

lot of old school cats are frustrated and jealous, because all the new-school

kids are making the money,” Blow continued. “But not me. I support

the new hip-hop and wanna see these guys be successful and get the money and

make as much money as they can. My hat goes off to the new kids cause they’ve

taken it to another level.”

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