Master P and Romeo Make Good on Promise to NC Students

Loud screams from students at a Monroe, North Carolina middle school greeted rap mogul Percy “Master P” Miller and his son Romeo last week, as the pair rewarded eighth graders for keeping their test scores up.

 

The Millers’ June 6 appearance at Monroe Middle School was the result of a promise made to the students during a surprise visit to the school on September 13, 2007.

 

Master P. vowed to return to the school with Romeo if the students did well academically.

 

As a result, Master P. and Romeo stopped production on a movie being filmed in California, to serve as keynote speakers during the eighth grade class’ graduation ceremony.

 

Master P. expressed how proud he was of the students, while encouraging them to be active in attaining success.

 

“You’ve taken the first step. Education is so important,” Master P. said. “I came from the streets, but I was able to change my life. I was able to change my life because I wasn’t afraid to further my education. Go out and find yourselves. Find your dreams. This is such a great school to be at.”

 

Romeo echoed his father’s inspirational message as he stressed the importance of staying in school, getting a good education and saying no to drugs and gangs.

 

“I’m the oldest of three brothers and three sisters, so anytime I can give back to kids, I’m feeling good about that,” said Romeo, who performed for and shook hands with the graduates.

 

“I feel really blessed to be able to give back to these students,” Romeo added. “This is the future here. To see that people really do care about them really boosts their self esteem.”

 

The middle school visit is the latest in a string of appearances for Master P., who promotes education, while speaking to youth around the country about violence, drugs and gangs through his program Let the Kids Grow.

 

The mogul hopes his own success can motivate kids to rise above their surroundings to become successful.

 

“I’m here to show kids you can break cycles,” Master P. said. “I was able to come from a community where people were known for selling drugs and being in gangs.”

Related Stories