2008’s Biggest Stories #3: Trick Trick Vs. Yung Berg and The Gay COmmunity

Detroit’s Trick Trick, the self-proclaimed “villain” of

Hip-Hop, made himself one of the culture’s biggest talking points this year

courtesy of one-sided feuds with Yung Berg and the gay community.

         

Over the summer, talkative rapper Yung Berg was mercilessly

beaten and relieved of his trademark Transformer chain mere moments after

stepping into Trick’s Plan B nightclub.

         

In an exclusive interview, Trick denied responsibility

for the attack while at the same time making his disdain for Berg known.

         

“First of all I ain’t no jack n*gga. I don’t need to

jack nann n*gga to get what I gotta get,” Trick told AllHipHop.com in August.

“Karma’s a muthaf*cka so I’m not taking no n*gga’s shit. I earn mine. I don’t

need that piece of sh*t aluminum foil chain the b*tch had on no way.”

         

The beating left a battered Yung Berg unable to

complete a scheduled performance for Hot 102.7’s Summer Jam.

         

Later, Trick admitted that it was his crew that

committed the assault. However, he insisted Berg deserved it for his alleged

disparaging comments about Trick and dark skin women.

         

“I saved that n*gga’s life. He would probably be dead

right now or in a coma if I hadn’t ran over there and pushed the lil homies back

so they could quit stomping this n*gga,” Trick elaborated. “You can’t be saying

‘f*ck Trick Trick’ and you don’t like dark skin women. I was gonna school the

little n*gga to the ropes of the game! If you gonna take some notes, take notes

from an OG. The lil homies got that trophy [the chain], I don’t want that sh*t.

I don’t have any problems with the little n*gga. I [just] don’t like him, and

he ain’t got to never come back to this b*tch.”

         

Although Yung Berg has since remained mute on the

incident, Trick Trick as recent as mid December was seen sporting the

Transformer chain at an Atlanta concert.

         

Three months later, Trick Trick turned his venom on an

unlikely target, the gay community.

         

Prior to the release of The Villain, his second studio album, Trick unexpectedly blasted

the homosexual lifestyle and barred gays from purchasing the LP.

         

“I’m a go on record right now with this. Homosexuals

are probably not gonna like this album,” Trick stated to AllHipHop.com in

November. “I don’t want your faggot money any goddamn way. I don’t like it

[homosexuality]. Carry that sh*t somewhere else.”

         

The album featured a self-titled track deriding gay

activists Ellen DeGeneres and Rosie O’Donnell, referencing them as “dyke

b*tches” and vowing to send a “scud missile right through their f*cking cruise

ship.”

         

The Detroit rapper carried his venom over to the issue

of gay adoption, stating “He goes both ways/Either way he’s gay/Ain’t no other

way to say/He’s a f*ckig faggot  so I’m

lettin’ off my AK/Bust ‘em in his forehead/He ain’t worth lettin’ live/A man

and a man shouldn’t raise another man’s kids!”

         

Right on the heels of Proposition 8 banning gay

marriage in California, the Gay and Lesbian community was infuriated by Trick’s

unprovoked comments.

         

“I really can’t get past the fact that Trick Trick

calls himself that name,” stated Camilo Arenivar, founder of the alternative

LBGT site OutHipHop.com. “With all the homework he did on Rosie’s cruises and

gay adoption, he should have found out that a ‘trick’ is a word heavily used in

the gay community to describe what a gay hustler turns to make a buck.”

         

Trick remained defiant in spite of the mounting

criticism, refusing to succumb to what he alleges is the growing acceptance of

homosexuality in mainstream society.

         

“It’s just that every time that you turn on the TV,

that sissy sh*t is on,” Trick countered. “And they act like its f*cking okay.

The world is changing for the worst when sh*t like that happens.”

         

Despite this and the high-profile Yung Berg assault,

Trick Trick’s The Villain received

little fanfare when released and failed to crack the Billboard Top 200.

         

It remains to be seen in 2009 whether Trick Trick can

foster more attention to his music, or if the Detroit rapper will continue to

spark controversy for statements and actions outside of the booth.

Related Stories