Exodus Movie And The Hebrew Israelite Influence on Hip-Hop

“Moses had to be of the Black race/cuz he spent 40 years in Pharaoh’s Place”
“Why Is That?” – Boogie Down Productions

The new movie, “Exodus: Gods and Kings,” has drawn a lot of heat because of the producer’s choice to, once again, select a white cast to portray the Egyptians and the Jews of the Old Testament. To make matters worst, media mogul, Rupert Murdoch further ticked people off when he tweeted the ludicrous question “since when are the Egyptians not white?” I guess if Murdoch decided to do a Hip Hop version of Exodus, the movie would star Macklemore as Ramesses the Great , Iggy Azalea as Nefertari and Eminem as Moses.

The question of the color of the ancient Egyptians and the original Jews has long been debated by scholars. Historically, white scientists have chosen to place a lily white civilization smack dab in the middle of the hot sands of Northern Africa. Thankfully, black scholars such as Cheikh Anta Diop (The African Origin of Civilization) , Yosef ben-Jochannan (We the Black Jews) and Anthony Browder (Nile Valley Contributions to Civilization) have dedicated their lives to correcting this misrepresentation of history. Interestingly enough, several white writers such as Godfrey Higgins (Anacalypsis) , Martin Bernal (Black Athena) and Arthur Koestler (The Thirteenth Tribe) have presented a more ,historically, accurate truth in their works. White authors such as Sigmund Freud (Moses and Monotheism) and Gary Greenberg (The Bible Myth) have even suggested that Moses, himself, might have been an Egyptian.

Also, there have been numerous religious groups that have challenged the idea of white Judaism since the early 20th century, such as “The Church of God and Saints of Christ,” and the “African Hebrew Israelites” who relocated to Dimona, Israel. We must never forget that it was Rabbi Arnold Josiah Ford who wrote the Universal Ethiopian Hymnal for Marcus Garvey’s UNIA, the largest black movement in American history.

However, the history of Black Jews (correctly known as Hebrew Israelites) is rarely discussed in this country. Movies like “The Ten Commandments “ have made Moses look like Charlton Heston instead of Wesley Snipes.

Even in Hip Hop, while rap historians have focused on the Islamic influence on the genre, relatively little attention has been paid to the influence of the Hebrew Israelite teachings. There have been many stories written on Rakim, Brand Nubian and Poor Righteous Teachers and their use of Hip Hop to “civilize the 85” but little has been written about artists like Killah Priest and Hell Razah using Hebrew teachings to “ gather the lost tribes.”

One of the first instances of Hebrewism in Hip Hop was Doug E. Fresh and The Get Fresh Crew’s 1985 hit, “The Show.” While the lyrics contained basically, esoteric Hebrew references, indiscernible to the untrained ear, Doug E Fresh’s other works such as “All the Way to Heaven” showed the influence of the Torah more directly. By the time he released “ Aiight” there was little doubt that he was reppin’ the 144 (thousand) as he wore the Star of David emblem at the beginning of the video and featured a cameo by some Hebrew Israelites at the end.

In 1989 , Boogie Down Production’s front man KRS One put writer Ella Hughley’s passage from her book, “The Truth About Black Biblical Hebrew-Israelites “ into lyrical form on the song “Why Is That?.” For many Hip Hop fans that was their first exposure to a black Biblical genealogy. He also used part of the same lyrics during the opening of the video for “You Must Learn.”

Years, later the Hebrew teachings came courtesy of Wu Tang affiliates , Sunz of Man. One of the most instrumental albums out of the Sunz of Man collective was Killah Priest’s solo joint, “Heavy Mental” which featured the classic cut “B.I.B.L.E (Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth.)

It must be noted that rappers, Drake and Shyne are also Jewish. However, they embrace a more “Orthodox” form of Judaism that differs from the teachings of the Hebrew Israelites.

So the question must be asked, with the influence of Hebrew teachings on Hip Hop, why has there been no large movement to emerge like the Five Percenters or the Nuwaubians. Although there is plenty of 5% terminology embedded within Hip Hop, where is the Hebrew swag? On almost every award show , some rapper yells “PEACE! “ after he receives his trophy. But when is the last time you heard a rapper yell out “Shalom ?”

Perhaps the reason is because of the strict laws and statutes attached to the Torah as opposed to the NGE (5%) ideology of being I Self Lord And Master. Or maybe, it is because the racial identity of the “Chosen People” is still too much of a taboo topic to be discussed in a Hip Hop industry that has no problem promoting black genocide on a continuous basis.

But in a time when movies like “Exodus: Gods and Kings,” are being released, Hip Hop should be some of the strongest voices correcting the historical errors portrayed in the film. Unfortunately, there has been mostly silence from the usually opinionated rap crowd.

The prophets of the Old Testament talked about how the Children of Israel would be a scattered people. This Is especially true in Hip Hop. However, they also prophesied that one day “ a remnant would return.” With our people living in almost total darkness, it is time for those who are supposed to be chosen to give light to the world to unite!

As we approach 2015, “the dry bones in the valley” must connect so we can stand up and be an exceedingly great army to save our people from destruction.

Shalom!

Minister Paul Scott represents the Messianic Afrikan Nation. He can be reached at info@nowarningshotsfired.com. Follow on twitter @truthminista