Tory Lanez Warns Parents About Momo Challenge; YouTube Responds To Concerns

Police caution about the "suicide game."

(AllHipHop News) Tory Lanez has made a name for himself in recent months for challenging his peers to rap battles. However, the Canadian singer/rapper appears to be extremely concerned about a viral challenge that's been spreading on the internet since 2018.

The "Momo Challenge" is described as a video meme that encourages children to perform dangerous acts such as violence and suicide. Lanez spoke about the situation to his 3.8 million Instagram followers.

"#MoMoChallenge KEEP YALL KIDS AWAY FROM THIS SH*T!!! MONITOR THE VIDEOS THEY WATCHING ON YOUTUBE. LIL KIDS [KILLING] EACH OTHER AND ALL TYPE OF SH*T. @youtube y’all need to FIX THIS SH*T!” wrote Lanez in the caption of an IG vid.

There have been reports of YouTube users editing kid-friendly videos to include images of Momo, a Japanese Ubume sculpture that instructs the children to text a number on WhatsApp. YouTube has responded to the unease surrounding the alleged clips posted on the platform.

"We want to clear something up regarding the Momo Challenge: We’ve seen no recent evidence of videos promoting the Momo Challenge on YouTube. Videos encouraging harmful and dangerous challenges are against our policies," reads a tweet from YouTube.

The company's verified Twitter account also tweeted, "If you see videos including harmful or dangerous challenges on YouTube, we encourage you to flag them to us immediately. These challenges are clearly against our Community Guidelines."

Photos of Momo were purportedly posted on Instagram, Facebook, Reddit, and Fortnite as well. With anxiety growing about the phenomenon, police departments and child psychologists are issuing warnings to adults to monitor their children's internet activity.

In contrast, some news outlets are suggesting the threat is overblown and stories of young people killing themselves as a result of watching Momo videos are uncorroborated. The reactionary hysteria is being called the actual danger because the panic could encourage potentially suicidal individuals to think about self-harm.

The Momo Challenge picked up steam again in English-speaking countries earlier this month. According to reports, a February 23 post by the Police Service of Northern Ireland, which has been shared over 9,000 times on Facebook, rekindled public interest about the online "game."

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