Chief Keef

The Creation of Chief Keef: Fixing Chicago’s Teen Murder Culture

“She said you left ya kids and they just like you/They wanna rap and make soul beats just like you/but they just not you.” -Kanye West, “Home”

Chief Keef is the son of Kanye West. Not biologically, of course, that progeny will soon be delivered by Ms. Kardashian. But, metaphorically speaking, Kanye, Keef is yours to claim. The age is right, at 35, Kanye could have a 17-year old child who grew up watching their parent mature and change. A child who likes all of the same songs and movies, who at times feels like a sibling, but is your own seed, the product of your youthful indiscretions whom you love, but who also represents everything you should have done differently when you were their age.

And young Keef grew up without his metaphorical “father.” By the time, he was walking, Kanye was producing. As Keef entered kindergarten, Kanye entered the mainstream making records for Roc-a-fella Records and headed for superstardom. And he never looked back. It was a chance encounter that would reunite the two. The “I Don’t Like” remix launched Chicago’s Drill music scene into the mainstream, kicked off dozens of signings by record companies looking for the next hot thing, and, arguably, contributed to a bitter rivalry that has resulted in death.

In honor of Lil’ JoJo, JayLoud, and Johnny Boy Da Prince, AllHipHop examines three potential causes and solutions for the violence in Chicago.

Chicago Has a Rich History… of Youth Violence.

In 1984, Chicago was rocked by the untimely death of high school student and basketball superstar Benjamin Wilson. His death brought national attention to Chicago’s crack-fueled murder rate. He was the 622nd murder victim that year.

ESPN’s 30 for 30 documentary, “Benji,” recently depicted the tragic story of the 17-year-old, gunned down on his way home from school after an argument. His convicted killers; two teenage boys. Wilson’s death is still a painful memory for many Chicagoans. Three young lives, just beginning, snuffed out before they each had a chance to fulfill what was clearly destined for them.

Last year, there were 506 murders in Chicago — the highest murder rate in 20 years. Unlike in the 80s, there is no clear culprit like crack. Most murders are taking place in Chicago’s poor, predominantly black and Hispanic West and South sides. They’re also considered to be gang-related. One disturbing trend fueling the current violence in Chicago, especially among young African-American males, like Lil JoJo, is retaliatory violence.

To combat the violence, the University of Chicago Crime Lab drafted a Youth Violence Prevention Plan which called for the launching of various prevention, intervention, and response initiatives, including a Gang School Safety Team where members of the Chicago Police Department Gang Enforcement unit and school officials work with and provide counseling to affiliates of shooting victims to discourage them from retaliation. The plan is important when one considers these numbers:

  • In 2010, 1,109 school-aged youth were shot
  • 216 of those were killed.
  • Nearly half of Chicago’s homicide victims are young people between the ages of 10 and 25

 Source: National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention.

Young People Feel Invisible

In his masterpiece novel, Ralph Ellison wrote about an Invisible Man. The nameless character was smart, talented, but found himself surrounded by one bad situation after the other. He was rarely seen — unless being used to push someone else’s agenda –, stereotyped and misunderstood until he self-destructed.

By the time Chief Keef’s video for “I Don’t Like” hit the internet, he was already a rising star in his hometown. The 4-minute clip was polarizing.  Blunt after blunt was being smoked, lidded eyes, guns, and male posturing from a bunch of little boys who were on house arrest instead of in school. While some accepted it as entertainment, others saw past the music to a larger issue. Reality sets: For every Chief Keef we see on Youtube or hear on the radio there are thousands of young “invisible men (and women)” who go unnoticed until something bad happens.


Keef was accused of being connected to murder even sending tweets that mocked the death of enemy rapper Lil’ JoJo. We called him careless and a troublemaker. He couldn’t speak, couldn’t rap. We rooted for him to go to jail, for his album to flop; we damn near wrote his obituary. Record executives saw a cash cow and signed him to a reported $6 million deal.

We treated him like a grown man while ignoring the fact, “He’s only 16.” He’s no Diggy Simmons. Keef was in the big leagues, where most of the stars are twice his age.

As hip-hop gets older, its artists get younger.  Their knowledge of hip-hop’s origins and principles are limited. Being part and respecting the legacy isn’t important. Therefore, when 50 Cent and Young Jeezy tried to mentor Chief Keef, he snubbed their mentorship. Now Keef is left on his own surrounded by inexperienced peers and enablers while he spends 60-days in an Illinois youth center for violating parole, fights a child support case and navigates a music industry that cares more about instant sales than longevity.

Real mentorship has to be put in place for rising stars, and they have to accept it. In Chicago, programs like Becoming a Man (B.A.M.) teach young men socio-emotional skills and train young people to understand their thoughts and actions. Mentorship can and will help young people realize the value of their own lives making them less likely to take someone else’s.

Gun Laws are Largely Ineffective in Inner Cities

After the tragic mass shooting in Newton, Connecticut — which killed 26, including 20 children — President Obama’s quickly set the ball in motion for stiffer gun controls. The President’s plan includes:

  • Criminal background checks for all gun sales
  • Reinstating the assault weapons ban
  • Restoring a 10-round limit on ammunition magazines
  • Eliminating armor-piercing bullets
  • Providing mental health services in schools
  • Allocating funds to hire more police officers
  • Instituting a federal gun trafficking statute

The plan will be debated for its effectiveness in stopping mass shootings. But, it clearly will have little to no effect on inner city violence. Most urban gun violence is committed with illegal or stolen guns, experts agree that what will be required in cities is a change of culture. In Black and Brown Chicago, with its high number of broken homes, a high unemployment rate (contributing to robbery homicides), and a strong gang culture,  no political plan is enough to reverse generations of violence. Add to this, thousands of illegal guns, a culture of anger and a lessening sensitivity to violence and the powder keg erupts.

Chicago is a tale of two cities.

There’s are the high murder rates and violence in the hood. Then, there the city that President Obama and Oprah call home; the city where the First Lady and First Daughters were born. The President was a Senator from Illinois before his meteoric rise to the White House. Now, former White House Chief of Staff, Rahm Emmauel is Mayor of Chicago. There was a hope he would bring some of this Obama power to help change the city. No such luck. Perhaps, people don’t know how bad the situation is. When the media focuses its attention on gun violence, it’s on mass shootings, deadly, but rare. Not cities like Chicago where more locals were killed in 2012 than American soldiers in Afghanistan.

It’s easy to point fingers or ignore what is going on in Chicago. Tweeting RIP isn’t enough to evoke change. It’s time that we recognize the young people growing up on our music and acknowledge that some of it may be affecting them in a negative way. It’s time to mentor emerging rap artists. It is time for hip-hop to put less emphasis on guns and murder in lyrics. It is time for hip-hop to establish a true social agenda and use our power for the good of the communities from whence we came and to whom we speak. Because Chief Keef, belongs to all of us, and his story is all of our story and the ending is ours to write.

ALSO READ: A History of Violence: The Black Gangs of Chicago

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  • I agree. We can’t just leave our kids in the streets to die>>>

  • Reblogged this on The Music Business Revisionist.

  • In Chicago, only 30% of black males graduate from high school. For every black male that receives a high school diploma, there are two who don’t. Only 3% of them obtain a
    bachelors degree by the time they’re 25. That’s 1 out of every 100. Those statistics are disappointing and alarming. I’m not saying this to discourage you, but rather to motivate you. I want to awaken you from your slumber. The lack of education among black males is unacceptable. We cannot sit silently and allow this tragedy to continue.

    It’s time for us to do the right thing and take on the responsibility of being role models. Change does not happen without action. We need to work together to motivate these kids and show them that there is something bigger and better out there, and they have an opportunity to claim it. That won’t happen if we don’t take these kids outside of their everyday environment and show them what there is to offer—the opportunities available to them when they choose to work hard to achieve an important goal. Show them what it’s like to be a pilot. Let them experience the Young Eagles Program by a chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, which gives children their first air plane ride for free. Take them off the basketball court and let them job shadow a teacher, an architect, a bank executive, a fireman, or a graphic designer.

    The sad truth is, so many of our teens have never even left Chicago. They don’t know anything but the life they’ve lived. How can we expect them to be anything different than basketball players and rappers, if that’s the only thing they’ve been exposed to? I’m not saying those are bad things to want to be—I was a basketball player and a rapper. But I used those as a means toward the life I wanted and who I wanted to be—not my ultimate and only goal. Teens need to know that there’s a big difference between being a rapper and a recording artist. There’s a huge difference between being a ball player and a professional athlete. Just ask Michael Jordan. He could have been a ball player, shooting hoops every day with his friends, but he made a choice. He wanted more. And he knew that in order to get it, he was going to have to work for it. What happened? MJ became the greatest player of all time. He was a responsible father and a stellar role model for kids everywhere. Everyone wanted to be like Mike.

    How many people do you think want to be like an unemployed high-school dropout who plays street ball and listens to rap music all day, every day? Not many. But there are too many kids like that. The difference between them and the Michael Jordans of the world is that they didn’t want something so bad that they’d do anything for it. Nobody took the time to show them that there’s more to life than hoops and hip hop.
    They’d study, work hard, and give more than 100 percent effort if they wanted it bad enough.

    Kids can’t know what they want if they don’t believe it’s possible for them to achieve it. At one time, that was true for me. I wasn’t inspired to be anything more than a rapper
    and ball player. When I looked to my future, it was more of the same. I didn’t dare to dream beyond my environment because that’s all I knew. Every time a Nas album dropped, I skipped school like it was a holiday. It was the only thing I had to look forward to. But I’ve since learned that there’s so much more to life if you’re willing
    to stick your neck out and go for it. The first thing that has to go are excuses. If a kid has the capacity to memorize a rap album, he can memorize an ACT practice exam. If he spends enough time on the court that he can shoot more than 70 percent from the free throw line, he has enough time to study algebra and get more than a 70
    percent on his next test. It’s about making choices and taking responsibility for your own future. It’s about rising above your surroundings and circumstances and striving for more, even if you don’t receive support or encouragement.

    I graduated from an alternative high school—a school that provided a nontraditional curriculum. Alternative schools offer a more flexible program of study than a traditional school. My future was non-existent, until one day I received unexpected inspiration from something I learned at school. I remember the exact moment I became motivated—it was when a teacher told me that Egypt was built by Africans. Dang, I thought, you’ve got to be kidding me! The only pictures of Egyptians I’d ever seen were of light skinned Europeans. I never attributed their works with my heritage. I
    never knew or paid attention to the fact that Africans had made such remarkable achievements and contributions to the world. I immediately became inspired. I was going to be somebody—I was going to be an Archeologist.

    I was so pumped that I ran to my guidance counselors office—excited and proud, I told her I wanted to excavate and be an archeologist. She looked at me and said, “Jahmal, how do you plan to get there? Have you thought about going to a trade school?” In
    her eyes, she wasn’t discouraging me, but rather trying to be realistic. I didn’t have the grades and hadn’t shown the kind of incentive it took to get to college or succeed once I got there. I refused to entertain her suggestion—anything other than being told
    I’d be accepted at Michigan University was something I wasn’t ready to hear. For the first time in my life, I was inspired to rise above my circumstances.

    Well, her phone rang and while she was distracted, I took a book called “All American Colleges” off her shelf and quickly ripped out a page. I was hoping I’d taken a page that said NYC or California, but had to settle for what I got—Nebraska. Wayne State College, Nebraska, to be exact. It wasn’t what I wanted, but it was all I had. I didn’t think my guidance counselor was going to help me, so I was going to have to do whatever I could to get into college if I wanted to be an archeologist. I put the book back on the shelf and headed down the stairs to call up Wayne State. I dialed 402-375-4000 and told them to send me a packet. That’s honestly how I ended up going to college.

    So Wayne State is was. I had only applied to one other college—at the beginning of my senior year, I applied for admission to Howard University, chosen because Puffy went there. But I never received a reply. On the way to Wayne State, though, my
    father told me that he’d received a letter that said I wasn’t accepted to Howard, but he never gave it to me. He didn’t want that to discourage me.

    If I’d seen that letter, I might have been discouraged, but I’d like to hope that I would have kept trying. We’re a people that’s so impulsive. We have to be willing to sacrifice immediate gratification in order to realize a higher good. In other words, we can’t let ourselves get beaten down the first time we try and don’t succeed. That’s an excuse to stay where we are…as an adult, I’ve realized that excuses are a childish way of thinking.

    At Wayne State, I played basketball. I listened to and recorded rap music. I was known on the court and on the hip hop circuit. But I used basketball and hip hop as a means to become more. They helped me to become a first generation college graduate. I
    became a member of the minority – like the Marines, I was one of the few and the proud—I was 1 out of 100. When I graduated from college, my father looked me in the eye and said, “Son, I’m proud of you. If you don’t graduate high school today, you’re limiting yourself tremendously. Suburban students are graduating high school with enough credits to cut down on a semester of college. We barely have enough credits to graduate.”

    I tell this story in my book, Athletes and Emcees. It’s about pushing past peer pressure and rising above the low-income inner-city mentality that has gripped us and kept us
    from achieving our potential for far too long. It’s about wanting more than our present way of life and taking the action and responsibility to make it happen.

    It’s time to stop accepting the status quo and put a spark in our youth, so that they will want to be more, do more, and have more. It’s not going to happen on its own. My dad was right—without an education, opportunities are limited. Without a job, people turn to the streets and find something they can be a part of. They join gangs and commit crimes. If they commit a felony, they’re drug down even more. Nothing can destroy a future faster than crime. Convicted felons can’t vote. They can’t get a job, and the military won’t accept them. Forget college, because they won’t be eligible to receive financial aid. They can’t even receive unemployment, food stamps, or loans. The stigmas will be as permanent as the tattoos on their necks. And the only place crime
    will get them is deeper in the cycle of poverty.

    A few months ago, I gave a speech at Cook County Correctional facilities. I spoke to the Automatic Transfer Unit, consisting of young men who were headed downstate for murder for twenty-plus years. I’d never been so anxious before giving a speech. But when it was over, I realized that those young men looked no different than you and I. They had just made bad decisions. It’s our job to be role models to these kids and encourage them to be good citizens. It’s never too late to turn your life around.

    Only 1 out of every 100 black men under the age of 25 have college degrees. More than 1 out of 100 have been in jail or prison. We’re at war, and the death totals are far greater than the death rates of Vietnam and World War II. We can become a statistic or decide that it’s time to rise above and win the war. It can be done. But it cannot be done unless we make education a priority. Stop thinking of college as information consumption and start thinking of it as an avenue for creative output. Stop teaching kids what to learn and start teaching them how to learn. Stop trying to get them through the system and show them how to rise above it.

    If a kid can memorize an entire rap album, he can memorize an ACT practice exam. If a kid has a role model who will take him under his wing and show him he has other possibilities, he can do anything he puts his mind to. He can be more than an athlete
    or an emcee—he can be whatever he wants to be. The choice is theirs to make…but first, they have to know they have a choice.

    There’s more to life than hoops and hip hop. Like the Africans who built Egypt, we can help these kids build a better future. With a dream, some inspiration, and a little hustle and grind, we can win this war—one kid at a time.

    • $18592567

      Forward me the Cliff Notes ^^^^^

    • sean barnes

      this was excellent and real talk brutha I salute you…..

    • Arckitect Fx Fam

      I just glanced the top and the words ” I’m not saying this to discourage you, but rather to motivate you. I want to awaken you from your slumber” those were beautiful words. The messages has to be spread, thats my goal in life. I think people like you and I need to stay connected. Do you mind sharing you’re email?

  • Guest

    I am sitting here reflecting on my teen years, and if I am to be Honest with myself, I was highly influenced by what I would hear and see. I loved Bone Thugs n Harmony- So I tried to smoke weed and thug like them. I wanted to join a gang because I was sure they were in some gang in Cleveland. I went through my Wu Tang faze- I always wore a book bag, I started studying the 5% culture and wearing head wraps, because its what I heard in there music and saw in some of their videos.Then there was the great Bad Boy Faze…I started wearing the Big Lil Kim sunglasses..and was dying to get my hands on Something called Prada, not even knowing what it was. You are right when you say, as hip hop gets older, the artist get younger..which mean teenagers and under 25 year olds are watching their peers and thinking, I can and want to do that. I want to Pop molly, I want to try Cough syrup, I want to date a Bad white or Foreign Bitch, I want a stripper as my girlfriend, I want all gold everything, I want my girl to kiss other girls, I want pink or blue hair, I want to smoke on Keisha, and all this other dumb shit that today’s hip hop is telling me is okay. ..I understand why teens think this is okay, this is whats being fed to them…such as Bone , and Snoop and all his murder was the case bull was fed to me when I was that age. But Its not going to get any better as long as hip hop does not get any better. I cant totally blame hip hop for unruly Teens, its pop culture as a whole that’s screwed up….but until Popular Mainstream artist start setting real examples, Chief Keef is what we get…And that’s that shit I don’t buy…

    • Pierre Elliott

      THIS IS NOTHING BUT MINSTREL RAP MUSIC. LETS GET IT RIGHT,************

      THIS IS NOT HIP HOP, THIS COMMERCIAL WHITE OWNED RAP MUSIC.

      ITS LIKE HIRING PEOPLE AT A JOB, DO YOU WANT COMPLIANT MONKEYS?

      OR PEOPLE WHO WILL ACTUALLY SAY SOMETHING OF**RELEVANCE*?

      • RichFromBX

        ahh yes, the white man’s fault again…I guess so long as there’s always the “white man’s fault” excuse black people will never have to take personal responsibility for anything…

        oh, your son sold drugs and was killed over a corner, nope nothing you could’ve done would’ve changed that…it’s the white man’s fault…

        oh, you didn’t go to school past freshman year of high school and didn’t learn a trade either, yes, the white man’s fault you’re uneducated and unqualified…

        oh, you’re black, educated, you have a great family and a great job, didn’t have to run the streets and be a thug…must not be white people on whatever planet you’re from…

      • His comment obviously went COMPLETELY over your head. I don’t even like to play the race card but the situation gotta be called for what it is. He’s talkin about the MUSIC and how shit’s manipulated to put out certain messages and images…so far as his “excuse” you speak of…what Black man is the head of any one of the Big Four labels, or the major radio stations, or the video channels? Don’t worry, I’ll wait. It’s those label heads refusin to sign certain artists or release their projects if those artists stand their ground and say they ain’t promotin the bullshit. It’s the (mainly) White program directors at the radio station that won’t give certain artists any burn cuz their messages are “too positive”. And you must not remember when BET deemed Little Brother “too intelligent” for their audience right after they got bought bout by Viacom…in effect callin their majority Black viewers simple-minded fools. Back when a Black man did run BET before he sold us all the fukk out, there was actually a lil somethin on that channel at one time called BALANCE where their shows highlighted ALL aspects of Black culture, not just the negative (props to Teen Summit, this new generation could definitely benefit from that show). You’d turn on Rap City and revel in all of Snoop’s debauchery, then the next video you might catch Cube and ‘Face talkin about “Fukk Bill and Hilary” and how gangstas don’t live that long…followed by some Tribe, who just made that feel-good shit that made you proud to just be YOU, whether it was what the crowd was doin or not. Soon as the guards changed though, any and all thoughts of balance went straight the hell out the window. Yeah us Black folks should probably let it sink in that it ain’t cool to keep pullin the shuck and jive act just cuz a check’s bein cut or there’s a “possibility of a check bein cut in the future”, and get back to that sense of pride we once had…but when it’s all said and done it ain’t us holdin that carrot in front of our faces and puttin us in the position where we have to literally degrade ourselves just to get that carrot. Myself I could never get that hungry, but as we can clearly see there are a lotta people who can. But again…it ain’t us runnin the minstrel show, we’re just the performers, no matter how you slice it.

  • Tha High Priestess™✨

    I am sitting here reflecting on my teen years, and if I am to be Honest with myself, I was highly influenced by what I would hear and see. I loved Bone Thugs n Harmony- So I tried to smoke weed and thug like them. I wanted to join a gang because I was sure they were in some gang in Cleveland. I went through my Wu Tang faze- I always wore a book bag, I started studying the 5% culture and wearing head wraps, because its what I heard in there music and saw in some of their videos.Then there was the great Bad Boy Faze…I started wearing the Big Lil Kim sunglasses..and was dying to get my hands on Something called Prada, not even knowing what it was. You are right when you say, as hip hop gets older, the artist get younger..which mean teenagers and under 25 year olds are watching their peers and thinking, I can and want to do that. I want to Pop molly, I want to try Cough syrup, I want to date a Bad white or Foreign Bitch, I want a stripper as my girlfriend, I want all gold everything, I want my girl to kiss other girls, I want pink or blue hair, I want to smoke on Keisha, and all this other dumb shit that today’s hip hop is telling me is okay. ..I understand why teens think this is okay, this is whats being fed to them…such as Bone , and Snoop and all his murder was the case bull was fed to me when I was that age. But Its not going to get any better as long as hip hop does not get any better. I cant totally blame hip hop for unruly Teens, its pop culture as a whole that’s screwed up….but until Popular Mainstream artist start setting real examples, Chief Keef is what we get…And that’s that shit I don’t buy…

    please excuse anee Mrs Spayled Wurdz….

    • Pierre Elliott

      you see in the video, they are shirtless, like slaves fresh off a boat.

      • Tha High Priestess™✨

        yes I see. It is terrible, and sad.

    • Rafael da silva

      you are right but it’s the parents who should take care of the kids not ……… Rappers they ain’t did shit wrong the only people you can blame are their own parent ………… if teenagers like all that gangster shit you did not take the time for your own children and should have make more time for yo own kids ………rappers today only talks shit but tupac was way more violent and he was one of the biggest rappers of this age

  • Pierre Elliott

    THIS IS NOTHING BUT MINSTREL RAP MUSIC. LETS GET IT RIGHT,************

    THIS IS NOT HIP HOP, THIS COMMERCIAL WHITE OWNED, NIGGER-HOP MUSIC.

    ITS LIKE HIRING PEOPLE AT A JOB, DO YOU WANT COMPLIANT MONKEYS?

    OR PEOPLE WHO WILL ACTUALLY SAY SOMETHING OF**RELEVANCE*?

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  • Blue Skies

    Wow. Great artical. It’s sad to see our young men get lost to the system. Hip-Hop is put in place to perpetuate the ignorance. Materialism, promiscuousness, violence, drug use, drug sales, and abusive alcohol use is 95 percent of the subject matter in mainstream Hip-Hop. That’s why these record executives are willing to pay Chief Keff 6 Million.

    • greenhouse records

      You have to understand its art imitating life, not life imitating art.

    • Sade Davis

      Yes!! Its no wonder my 11yr son can only come up with two things to do with his future, 1. Football or Basketball, 2. Rapping/singing…… No wonder, he reads how a goofball like Keef can get rich by being ignorant. I swear, its so hard out here to raise kids up the right way these days. Those kids who come from stable families with good qualities are the minority and face a different set of obstacles from their own peers because they are then labeled as “cornablls” or “suburban wannabes” ..smdh, thats that sh*t I dont like:-)!!!!

  • 313

    Chief Keef IS NOT HIP HOP…its just Rap! And Chief Keef IS NOT the son of Kanye West – they have TOTALLY different backgrounds, upbringings, and exposure to culture…Chief Keef is just some punk ass thug criminal – his daddy is the damn streets and it shows!

    • chiboi773

      WHAT!!?!?!? Hip Hop is a culture. Rap is something you do on a instrumental. no other Genre of music “raps” on a instrumental so in a fairness, weather you like it or not, Chief keef is Hip Hop.

    • Bumpy Johnson

      im still looking for the “he cried in couret article”

    • greenhouse records

      u must be old

  • 1 Mic

    truth be told the 90’s was much worse in Chicago, the violence is actually regressing from than. Same thing like NYC and L.A look how better than have gotten since the crack epidemic.

    • Bumpy Johnson

      same in houston, baltimore n DC

  • chiboi773

    Chicago didnt really have a crack problem until the early 90s. and i just read some cray ass shit, basically, only, 6% of chicago shooters are convicted, 94% walk free

    • Darkfather504

      This be the problem!!

  • DMX

    free sosa

  • DMX

    GDK^^ 300 SHIT THEM BRICKS AINT WIT THE SHITS

  • disqus_20UvoXnsve

    bro dat nigga cheif keef go hard nigga get up off him cause he made it man just let it be man shout out to lil resse to RIP LIL JOJO

  • sean barnes

    this article is sad but too much of it is true, im from Chicago as well and I was in the streets and the drug game and I was blessed to get out, there is no one solution or quick way, all I can say is we have to provide more views of the world and other outlets rather then having them think the only and quickest way out is music, entertainment or sports! we are raising a culture that wants everything fast n easy and the truth is nothing worth having is easy and we need to instill in them that hard work is good and it will get you where you wanna go in life, they have to understand that life is built on choices and your choices now will directly effect your future…for more of my views go to @realseanbarnes

  • Tell me why you mad son

    You’re looking at it all wrong. These kids are the cattle that feed the system. They will either sell dope or commit another major crime, get shot and/or shot at someone else, etc. Guess what? Someone will be there making money on all of it. This qweef kid is just the billboard to promote the lifestyle, and all the young kids can say I can be like kool qweef. You want to blame a white man for exploiting your soul? That’s pretty weak. There’s no helping most of these kids, they don’t listen and only care about being cool. I’ve tried to help them; they sit in your classroom and look at you like you have two heads. Oh but it’s the environment, its the parents, blah blah blah. It’s life and most of these kids were dealt a bad hand. No one really cares. Politicians say they’re going to change things and you believed them, crime rate in Chicago worst in 20 years. Programs and education funding cut, narcotics and illegal weapons flood the streets. No one says it but they’re all cattle being lead to pasture. Look, I love my people but I’m done stressing myself about kids whose own parents don’t care or raise them. I have my own kids to worry about. Better yet, best job in town in terms of job security is joining the police force. This is what 25 years of perpetuating a FAKE culture has gotten us all! All of us over a certain age were all there baring witness. We saw when crack killed our neighborhoods, when hip-hop became something else that was loud, obnoxious, and didn’t represent typical life. Leased jewelry, leased cars, record advances, but rappers “keeping it real” right? I remember when rappers used to say things like “we’re just rapping, a lot of this stuff isn’t real.” It’s real now; kids are really killing each other, they ALL have guns, they have ALL been exposed to drugs, and they are having sex earlier than ever. These kids don’t have a childhood. Poor people; your kids don’t get the privilege of a childhood because adolescence is the training period for thug life. Don’t like what I’m saying or you don’t like the truth? I don’t care if you don’t like what I’m writing, but if you don’t like the truth do something about it! I’m living good, kids are safe, and will always know right from wrong. Praying for y’all out there in Chicago.

    • artcryme99

      so true….people with unhappy lives in poverty, not just financial poverty but mental poverty, having children. If your parents dont love you what chance do you have in life? There is no “saving” these children, they are cannon fodder by design.

  • this was deep, two thumbs up allhiphop!!!!

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  • Scott Freebass

    Another lost generation.

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  • Kanvas

    Its a video full of half naked young males chanting in some gibberish thats barely understandable. Please lord bring real hip hop back and stop this shit thats considered rap….