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Chuck D: Voicing His Opinion with Volume!

Darryl “DMC” McDaniels of Run-D.M.C. once told me, “Personally, I thought Public Enemy was way, way better than us.”

That should come as no surprise, even coming from one of the kings from Queens, seeing as how Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Professor Griff, the S1W, and Terminator X turned the world on its ear with their seminal albums in the late 80s and early 90s as Public Enemy.  They are widely regarded as one of the best and most important acts in Hip-Hop history.  In addition to brilliant production work by The Bomb Squad, P.E.’s use of rap as a platform for social and political commentary remains unrivaled.  This is due largely in part to the intellect, ability, and insight of the group’s aforementioned front man, Chuck D.Red_U

And while Chuck puts more substance in a single verse than most emcees do in an entire album, he still has extended his reach into book writing, speaking engagements, radio hosting, and being  a spokesperson for a variety of organizations.

On January 21, 2014, Chuck D gave a lecture at Davenport University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, as one of the school’s events to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  After Chuck addressed students and faculty in the Sneden auditorium, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee spoke with AllHipHop.com about Dr. King’s dream, what America can learn from the rest of the world, and, of course, music.

Chuck D is one of Hip-Hop’s greatest teachers; here is some of the knowledge that he was graciously willing to share.

AllHipHop.com: In what ways has Dr. King’s dream been realized?  In what ways has it not yet?

Chuck D: I think in the way that people dealt from the inside, from the inside as far as relating to people a lot more.  The content of character is at least starting with people relating to each other by their likemindedness instead of just their characteristics a lot more in the millennium.  The quality of the content (of character) has not been reached.  It has not been manifested yet, so I think the accountability that Dr. King exemplified at 26, 27- he didn’t use youth as an excuse. Today, we have used youth too much as an excuse for not doing or not being.  That’s the big difference from when Dr. King was actually living.

Young adults who were Dr. King’s age, (he himself) was a doctor and made a whole lot of positive movement at such a young age that it was never an excuse.  Like I said (of how Dr. King’s dream has been realized), the positive aspect is that at least more people have dropped their obvious segregated ways [and found ways] to relate to each other.  We can work on the reasons- everybody just being multi-color at a party, but with the derogatory [content] to Black history and legacy going on in the party and in the music is something that seriously needs to be looked at.

AllHipHop.com: You’ve obviously traveled the world many times and seen how other countries deal with things like race and equality.  What do you think America could learn, for better or for worse, from the rest of the world in regards to those matters?

Chuck D: America can learn from the rest of the world that this effort that’s made upon not having people chastised for who they are and not having their histories and legacies be looked upon frivolously.  The rest of the world tries to work on equality of its populations and America says it, but really keeps everything segregated because it’s such a big place.  So the segregation actually is still in effect because it works in many ways.

AllHipHop.com: Just a little more subliminally than it was at one time?

Chuck D: Yeah. America could learn so many things, or the United States I should say.  We could learn more about geography.  We could learn about where people are at dealing with their histories and dealing with their climates.  The United States can really learn so much from the rest of North America- Canada, the Caribbean and Central and South America.  We’ve just got to take the time to re-enforce that.

AllHipHop.com: How do you think Hip-Hop culture has benefited the most from the legacy of Dr. King?

Chuck D: Dr. King was never afraid.  I think Hip-Hop has benefited off of the boldness.  Hip-Hop artists in the 80s and early 90s, they had a boldness.  But they also had an accountable boldness too, so its (Hip-Hop) benefited off of that. Wether it’s actually fulfilled that?  I don’t think it’s been truthful and bold for all the right reasons.

AllHipHop.com: You were obviously talking about how music can affect people in a way that nothing else can (in your lecture).  Keeping that in mind, what were your thoughts when you first heard LL Cool J and Brad Paisley’s “Accidental Racist” song?

Chuck D: I understood the angle that LL and Brad Paisley took to try to bring worlds together and kind of drop some differences, but explain the differences.  It’s a misstep, but no different than the misstep where you have people out there screaming the N-word and telling everybody it’s popular culture.  And everybody seems to sanction it and say, ‘Yeah, it’s real.” Both of them are wrong, but LL came from the other direction with it.

You can definitely have this printed: the whole thing of using the word to desensitize and make it less impactful is some bulls**t.  Who said that?  ‘If we keep using the word ‘ni**a’ that means in a while it’ll be used so much that it loses impact.’ But who told you that?  Who came up with that one?  And nobody ever seems to find the ubiquitous “they,” but they said… who’s “they”?  Nobody ever seems to find this person that says, “From this day on…”  When people started coming down on LL, I knew they were also coming down on the bitter themselves.  There’s a lot of things to be called out as well with that, that should’ve led a trail of people being called out for letting the N-word and the B-word slide so easily through popular culture.

[Davenport University’s Dr. Andre Perry then speaks up after some encouragement from Chuck.]

Dr. Perry: The most offensive thing in Hip-Hop to me in recent time was the whole Jay Z / Harry Belafonte thing.  From this regard, Harry Belafonte and his entire clique at that time, they risked it all.  I think as men and women we’re equivalent and Harry Belafonte is no better than Jay.  But it’s one of those respect things.  I was like, ‘Wow, you (Jay) are going to disrespect a true leader.’

Chuck D: In the entertainment business, if we had to say pecking order, honor your mother and father.  You honor them. Harry Belafonte is the first multi-faceted – the movie, the platinum-selling record.  And then he said with all that I’m still going to go out there and make better in the marches with our leader and go hand-by-hand with him, not just plug in, plug out.  You’ve got to honor that and you’ve got to honor it with some kind of activity.

AllHipHop.com: Hip-Hop recently turned 40.  What does it need to do to remain relevant for another 40 years?

Chuck D: Hip Hop turned 40.  It needs to be relevant when this country embraces itself to the world of Hip-Hop, then it’ll probably step up right.  Local artists must be supported.  There’s so many local artists that have been part of Hip-Hop. Their communities can’t be afraid to support them.  Also, the global impact of Hip-Hop is not being respected.  Also, groups (and collectives) have to take place in Hip-Hop more.  Also, women as groups and individuals need to be included in Hip-Hop.  If none of these things take place, then it’s defeating its purpose of how it began and where its gotta go.

For the recorded interview of everything above and more, give this audio a listen.

  • wickedjones

    Its about time y’all wrote a good article. thank u

    • Shad Reed

      You’re welcome.

  • brotha_man

    now this is hiphop

  • Elayorx El

    Interesting points in the article, which seriously stress, and confirm that we continue to weaken, with each new generation, seemingly. Malcolm probably articulated it best, by stating we need separation first to solve our problems effectively, but apparently this is also known by other forces that for whatever reason, can’t let that happen. This is all not as complicated as we try to make it.

  • Montezuma1

    Now if only Chuck would denounce Farrakhan and his mumbo jumbo teachings. 13 ft men from Mars. The mother wheel. Elijah isn’t dead and so on. Chuck promoted Farrakhan as a prophet. Correct yourself Chuck.

    • wickedjones

      How is Chuck going to denounce Farrakhan when he is a Muslim in the NOI. Ppl have a right to believe whatever they want to believe. Thats why you’re you and he is he.

      • Montezuma1

        He has a right to believe whatever foolishness he likes but he’s irresponsible for taking musical popularity and promoting theological lunacy. Each of us must be careful in the direction we point others. Farrakhan is a charlatan. Chuck promoting him makes him either extremely ignorant or just as duplicitous.

      • wickedjones

        and thats your opinion, and if you feel you’re doing something effective then fine. Its so easy for black folks to criticize one another (crab mentality). You don’t like it? don’t by the album.

      • Montezuma1

        Crab mentality? For pointing out wrong? You shameless ni99as will come up with any excuse to not change your wicked ways. The NOI is a fraud perpetrated upon ignorant uneducated blacks desperate to believe in something. Speaking truth is always effective in case you didn’t know because you never know who you save from the jaws of falsehood. You’re either part of the problem or part of the solution. False doctrine regardless of source or skin color of those spewing it is a problem. You are an emotional intellectual lightweight unable to digest discomforting truths. I enjoy watching you squirm on here. Now do the rest of us a favor and go kill yourself.

      • wickedjones

        i respectively disagree. The black man created All religions. Period. Like I said. If u don’t like something, don’t buy it or listen to it. Thats just like me saying I listen to NWA, (which i do) then criticize them. Secondly, I don’t need to criticize every artist who believes in white jesus and heavens in the sky just because i don’t believe in that bs. You can believe what you want to believe. Trick, you sound like a wannabe academic. But lets say u have reached the pinnacle of education. You sound like du bois, all uppity and sh!t, who had a thing against garvey (who he called a monkey) and booker t washington. And at the end that fool end up dying in Ghana. Around the darkies he hated the most. what irony.

      • Montezuma1

        You’re all over the place. I’m talking about a con man named Louis Farrakhan. How do you rid a house of vermin? One rodent at a time. Let’s start with Screwy Louie. The leader of the Nation of Islam headquartered in Chicago where black males slaughter each other with impunity. All that knowledge of self in their midst sure did them good. MASTER Fard was from India and got you fools calling yourself Asiatic when you’re directly descended from Africa. So much for black pride. You claim to be the muslim Lost Tribe of Shabazz. Where is Shabazz in the Qu’ran or Arabia? lmao. The only part of that name correct is LOST. Muslims who don’t make salaat. Muslims who undergo “military” training that resembles a “step show.” lmao The NOI and its members are so full of shyt it’s embarrassing. Muslims introduced to an Arab belief system by a fair skin Indian while claiming black supremacy. In typical ignorant ni99a fashion you fools worshipped Fard and called him “Allah in the flesh.” There’s a touch of lunacy in the air…

      • wickedjones

        Its easy to criticize from a far. Maybe you should start a non for profit. Better yet, start a farm where u grow your own food. And on everything I love il be the first to buy something. Internet gangster.

      • Montezuma1

        Oh like the 1000 acres the NOI has? Or the overpriced water they once sold? lmao. Internet Gangster? Great comeback. Now I’m a gangster for spewing facts. Why not just call me fatso? Same difference. lmao

      • wickedjones

        I wasn’t talking about the noi farms. Im talking about you. Let me make myself clear. Why criticize black productivity. I don’t care if they believe God is a rock. What I’m saying is produce something instead of criticizing people who actively tries to make a difference. If you feel you can do better, then do it. No one gives a sh!t what you believe in. At least i don’t, and il support you 100 percent. Case in point, I can’t stand tyler perry’s movies. but since i know he employs a lot of black folk, I’m going to support him. fatso (lol)

      • Montezuma1

        What you’re missing is false doctrine offers false hope and serves as a distraction from meaningful resolution and solution. There’s nothing productive about what they do. They replaced a white Jesus with a white Fard. Replaced white supremacy with black supremacy. Etcetera. They took the same game the white man ran and painted it black and ran it on their own people. This is hypocrisy and betrayal of the highest order. The token testimonies they provide cannot negate the overwhelming exploitation and manipulation of their very own people. Our very own people.

      • wickedjones

        I disagree. But now I’m more pissed off that Kendrick didn’t take it. (sigh) I think we should debate this more in a religious forum. il let you close it out.

      • Montezuma1

        I’m done brother. Peace.

      • Montezuma1

        Man Chuck… er… I’m starting to think you’re a mental midget. My bad for giving your way too much credit. You actually believe that bullshyt? Hell naw. Lmaooooo

      • Cal

        The black man didn’t create all religions. Their are as many religions as at this point in time as their are people in the world as every individual believes something a little different. Not to mention that biologically women precede men – which is a fact and something you have turned a blind eye to in your grandiosity. That’s another trick these con artists cult leaders play, to exploit your perception with vanity feeding ideological intellectual constraints that encourage said followers to ignore the blatant obvious.

      • wickedjones

        let me correct my self. Major religions. So now we are debating the hen or the egg? I don’t believe Farrakhan is a cult leader. But i would love to know what religion a woman created.

    • Cal

      Your debate with him a few years ago has been removed from the internet completely. I wish it wasn’t. That was the first time someone really exposed the lunacy and hypocrisy of this guy out into the open. Anyway, professor griff is another whack job out and about encouraging young black men to worry about important shit like symbols on dollar bills, Illuminati conspiracy and if cheese wiz ingredients will turn your children into homosexuals, Farrakhan is a con artist to the nth and all that nonsense is a reflection of it. The whole Scientology thing made that blatant at this point. The only thing people in the hood need to worry about is knowing , learning or placing themselves in a role where they can provide something valuable that others are willing to pay for. That and personal growth.Cults and entertainment industry con artists can’t provide that …..they just prey on the desperate.

      • Montezuma1

        Yeah he was silly enough to engage me. Glad you saw it and even more glad to see another brother wise to the ways of these serpents. Peace!

    • Hi Monte. I remember that conversation. It has not been removed. it’s been AHH who deleted the old forum and moved it to Disqus. Not such a great move in my eyes. With their own forum they could increase their own web traffic.

      I also think Chuck needs to address Farrakhan. This guy has been exploiting weak minded people for too long. Selling them a fake version of Islam. Now since Ghaddafi is dead and his major financial backing went along with Ghaddafi, he has now found himself a new ally with Scientology.

      It’s time we expose false preachers and charlatans who prey on the weak circumstances of our people. Selling false hope and exploiting communities worse that crack dealers. Just to get themselves situated in the suburbs and donate the money to luxury brands. They are not investing into our neighborhoods. They don’t build anything with the money they take. They just consume at the expense of the weak so they can polish their egos.

      • Weedras

        as you mention Scientology i find it so strange that none of these illuminati conspiracy theorists have ever connected Scientology to anything in regards to their wack job conspiracies… thought hit me when i got a scientology magazine in the mail and was looking through it..

      • Montezuma1

        I agree. Farrakhan is not the only one but he’s a good start. Time to throw out the bums.

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  • Black Jay

    I don’t know. Sometimes our elders behave as though we as Black People have an elevated way of living. They behave as if slavery and racism never ripped apart the very fabric of the Black Family. Just because we aren’t BLATANTLY exposed to the same social ills that our ancestors were exposed to, it doesn’t mean that we don’t have painful or equally horrific experiences. Sometimes our elders sh*t on us with the “Y’all don’t know what hard times are” phrase. Never mind the fact that some of us (myself included) have experienced terrifying events (I actually saw the results of a lynching in 1998 in North Carolina).

    Chuck will always get my respect for what he’s done. But to say or insinuate that people should shut up based off the fact that our elders (Harry Belefonte) spoke, it’s wrong. Sometimes our elders are blatantly wrong. And for the record, I’ll say that the way Harry Belefonte went at Jigga was wrong. He was wrong in the same way that Bill Cosby is continuously wrong. It’s not the message that these two elder statesmen are wrong with. It’s their choice of delivery systems that make them wrong. They got that “Ivory Tower” mentality. Like the way Jim Brown played Kobe Bryant in public. Sure he had a point, but why is it that we find the need (and I’m speaking to elders and the youth) to shame a Black Man in the audience of White People?

    I’m just saying…. The elders aren’t always right. Them recognizing that would be a step.

    • Weedras

      a man as powerful as Belafonte if he wanted to speak to a man he can speak to a man privately.. he knew what he was doing when he publicly said that he was trying to shame Jay and His wife… and with that you can expect no better if fire is returned… i don’t care who you are but if you disrespect me and i know you could have chose a better route to communicate that disrespect that you deem ‘constructive criticism” then i’m firing back… even the greatest kings could get knocked off despite their legacies back in the day.. shit aint changed now…

      • Black Jay

        My point exactly. Chuck D is wrong on this one. He’s acting like someone asked Jay Z about Belafonte and Jay just blasted him. Like Belafonte was sitting in his rocking chair on a porch and Jigga just sh*tted on all of his struggles and accomplishments and hit him in the face with a basketball. Belafonte went at Jigga AND his wife. At the very essence, I’m a man. And old school or not, you come at my family and I’m coming at you. Them old school cats be wrong sometimes.

      • AlbertoRipRon

        In so many ways Jay did blast him. It’s the principle of how the situation is handled. Of course this is in the public news circle, so you’re not going to outright say things. You will say things in a roundabout way to mean the same thing.

        Too many times, youngins always jump to the “elders failed us”, but is that excuse to continue down a bullshit path just because you think your elders failed you?

        That creates more diversion and continues the bullshit thinking. It’s excuses and it always been excuses that held back people from evolving from simple monkey like actions.

        It’s time as a people we stop making excuses and stop saying “well, he does this and he does that”. It’s far beyond that point now and we are becoming less and less of factor rapidly. It’s getting back to the days before the civil rights and during that blacks folks are getting killed by racist whites because the respect for our people is there no longer because we don’t unite for one, and we don’t have respect for ourselves.

    • wickedjones

      One of the things that always bothered me about the early civil rights leaders, is that it seems they got some money and they left the poor people behind, and they stop supporting black businesses. They don’t like to pass the torch.

      • AlbertoRipRon

        So I take it you were there? Where in the hell you get all that from or are you just looking to point fingers instead of dealing with the problems we are facing now?

      • wickedjones

        I’m probably older than you, but I’m not ancient. (I’m 45) B4 integration, You had the black doctor, black policeman, teacher etc, living in the same neighborhood because they were forced to. What was the 1st thing we did when we got some money. We moved the hell out. So now u got belefonte with his half white kids, living in the nice suburbs, criticizing Jay Z, (don’t forget he did come from Marcy projects) because he aint buck dancing like he had to. Now do u want to know what I do to make a difference?

      • AlbertoRipRon

        Okay, so you weren’t involved with the civil rights leaders then. And Harry has done more for the fight than Jay Z has. Are you upset that he’s just calling it for what it is or you just upset about blacks moving out of the neighborhoods that has consistently gone down the drain?

      • wickedjones

        its easy to go holding hands with educated fools and go criticize the younger generation, eating grey poupon and sh!t. You cant keep running away from yo people. I am no bigger than the lowest.

      • LD51

        Because it seems like we can relate to Jay Z more than Belafonte does not make Jay Z right my brother. Any man that stands with the President of THIS United States while they are actively taking away our civil liberties, literally going against not our communities now but our constitution – what literally makes us the United States of America – and says I don’t have to do anything actively for my community because like Obama “my presence is charity” is nothing less than a d….. you know the truth, it just hurts that this is what we are left with. Believe me, it kills me, but I can no longer live with lies, the ones I have told myself in denial or any others.

      • LD51

        I feel your sentiment but believe that it is a little more complex than that. I believe this blight was forced upon us. Take a look at desegregation. Sure it was “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” and all that other BS but if you go into the black and brown communities of times past you would see the ideals of true community; black/brown owned businesses, organizations, restaurants, retail shops etc, completely self sufficient (even organizing city services such as waste mgmt & disposal, banking institutions, police, largely because whites didn’t care or think we deserved it, being the animals we are). Completely self sufficient black and brown communities, can you imagine that? They make us believe that is not possible.

        Once desegregation happened these same communities were gutted and left to die while those already with the most were coerced or chose to leave for greener pastures (suburbs, white communities). Without the help of Africans Europeans could do nothing to our people, NOTHING. The same holds true for our communities today. So I don’t take blame away from our people, the new found “Bourgeouis” or corrupt politicians, or people that are so tired or angry they just don’t give a f## anymore. But you have to understand that our early CIVIL RIGHTS leaders were murdered, incarcerated, and/or left the country (were forced out) long ago. Who we have left, those that work against us for our detriment, these are NOT civil rights leaders, these are puppets, nothing more, much less…

    • LD51

      I agree with you here. Many believe their own struggle (or that of their people), eternally, is the greatest struggle to take place. But there are many things worse than death. How about living a life of torture? A torture so cunning and complex you not only learn how to torture yourself, but you feel comfort in that pain. Technically, physically, it could be said that it was better for the slaves that were born here ‘free’ than those that drowned in their fathers/mothers/sisters/brothers piss, blood, and sh## traveling on the boats to the Brave Free New World. It was ‘better’ for those on the boat than those that were thrown off and drowned and so on. We MUST realize this is just a divide and conquer philosophy spread across generations. There is no time worse than now because more of our brothers and sisters are asleep and will die, tortured, without ever realizing their true divinity. I really hesitate to say this is the worst time in our history but feel emboldened to do so. While physically we are now able to scuttle around the globe, we do so with GPS trackers, NSA hackers, and multiple cameras on every single corner, capturing every single angle….

      Welcome to the new age: A SLAVE WITHOUT BORDERS

      “God has been replaced, as he has all over the West, with respectability and air conditioning.” – Amiri Baraka,

      • Opposite Of Everyone

        C’mon son, none of that ain’t sh1t compared to life for Black people prior to the 70s.

      • LD51

        I feel you but what I’m trying to say is life for black people then is life for black people now. For me, since energy cannot be destroyed, reincarnation is in the transfer of your energy through your bloodline. They did truly unspeakable things to us prior to the 70s. But my point was while the time period may be different, and we now look at them as Great great grand instead of brother, mother, father sister, they still did them to US. Back then things were done in the open. Kill a n*gger for whistling (literally) – no big deal. When I critically analyze the world around us; the ONLY thing that has changed is the method, not the madness.

      • Opposite Of Everyone

        We’re gonna have to agree to disagree. Whatever injustices we’re still undergoing, in my opinion we are in a strong enough place to be able to rise above that and prioritise helping the people in the rest of the world who are in a situation 1000 times worse than even the poorest American (ie those in the Middle East and Africa being killed, tortured, mutilated, starved, poisoned, no access to water etc etc).
        Does our own ish need to be perfect before we can help others?
        If you broke your leg but were still able to function to a lesser extent with the use of one leg, would you refuse to help anyone else until your leg was completely better?
        I’m sayin we have power! Not as much as you might want or feel you deserve but certainly enough that we can be more concerned about helping others than our own plight.

      • LD51

        You make a great point brother. And after reading how you just explained your opinion I think we may agree more than we realize. I think you’re absolutely right, because in all reality when will you ever really be “whole” truthfully, probably only when you are helping others and putting others suffering before your own plight. Yea, I agree with you. I guess I just am so tired of seeing and hearing nothing about anything of substance, Chiraq war zones, gentrification war zones, prison industrial complex zones, and hearing/seeing enough of my good friends dying off only for me to say damn, how could I have saved him/her? I’m tired of talking about what I could have done for ghosts, you know? And I truly feel that the over political correctness, ‘we all suffer the same’, is only rhetoric when acted as such but I believe our end goals are the same, once we all realize we truly are ALL brothers and sisters just of different shades then we would realize if any race or group or person is suffering anywhere than it is truly an injustice to us all and wouldn’t tolerate it. Thanks for making me think about that, I definitely see what you are saying now.

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  • jubileeshine

    Paul Robeson did it before Belafonte but JZ need to respect the struggle.

    • Black Jay

      How did Jigga disrespect the struggle? Belafonte came at HIM AND HIS WIFE for no apparent reason! IN PUBLIC! Just because you did some civil rights sh*t doesn’t mean you get the right to disrespect people without retribution. At best Harry Belafonte was wrong.

      • Rufus Buck

        Everything you said was correct except that Harry Belafonte didn’t just “do some civil rights sh*t”, he was on the front line with Martin Luther King to the point of posting MLK’s BAIL! When you enjoy a day off work on MLK Day, the legacy that is in remembrance is a legacy that Harry Belafonte was at the forefront of, among MANY other things.

        Also, Jay shouldn’t have trivialized Harry Belafonte by referring to him as “Mr. Day O”.

        But as you said… At best, Harry Belafonte was wrong. No matter your stature… don’t go after another brother in the press whilst simultaneously championing Bruce Springsteen.

      • Black Jay

        “Doing some civil rights sh*t” is by no means minimizing his contributions to the struggle. It’s my way of separating what he did with civil rights from what he did to his fellow Brother. It’s hip hop slang bro. And no matter what you say, all of the respect disappears if you attack me and my family. That’s BEING A MAN 101. He can’t cry foul after HE WAS THE AGGRESSOR WITH BEING DISRESPECTFUL. No contribution to society is a license to disrespect someone and then hide behind your accomplishments. Belafonte was as wrong as two left feet. And in reality, he deserved to be held accountable.

      • LD51

        Seriously? We have GOT to do better. “BEING A MAN 101” is not being an emotional cripple, lashing out at the first sign of perceived disrespect. Clearly you are a big Sean Carter fan. I am not, at all. Truthfully, he is a coward. Barneys, “my presence is charity”, his attacks on Bellafonte, calling him Mr. Day O and boy. What you fail to grasp is Bellafonte was/is at the front lines of OUR struggle. Jay Z is nowhere to be found. While Bellafonte was burning midKnight oil with Black prophets, leaders, pushers, and movers trying to find any way, whateveer way to help, save, their brutalized people, Jay Z believes his presence “like Obama” is charity, that’s enough. I honestly have no idea where to even begin at the absurdity of this whole situation/HOVA worship. I LOVE MY PEOPLE. I LOVE seeing them stunt, I understand why people champion Jay Z, he makes good music, and our active civil rights movement has been dead for many years now…but why is it dead, are there black people that helped our demise? If so, what kind of ACTIONS did they pursue? Did we win our civil rights? The fact that you can’t see that Jay Z is an Uncle Tom is because you are blinding yourself to the truth.

        “…actually, believe half of what you see. None of what you hear, even if it’s spat by me…”

      • Jdinero

        It’s not about right or wrong belafonte was not trying to gain any goddamn publicity he made a truthful statement about the true contributions of jayz on the community the black community 44 years old still rapping like you in the struggle and havent been out the “hoods” for a couple of decades now, it’s ridiculous he needs too promote more concious songs he keeps a lot of ppl in one state of mind this money is quicksand we work hard for it to spend it back on the ppl who makes us work so hard on it…success is in your mind…I rather leave my seeds with true knowledge and wisdom cause history has proven that this wealth you can’t take with you a lot of us will die in debt even the late musicians and celebrities, many have been robbed of their copyrights stripped clean by the same group of people we need to build a universal oligarchy.

      • Jdinero

        And bottom line jay z made up his mind he been took his oath like many black occult celebs artists do some feel guilty along the way and try to speak and we know what happens they are labeled crazy or dead..jay z said imma be that android and carry out their agenda…take it how you want JayZ doesn’t give a damn about any of us….#NOPE..moving on he too grown and knows too much to be rapping like he does..get him outta here..stop praising him so much, it’s really on us ppl

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  • Malik

    Hmm, Robert De Niro shitted on Jay in public and we are yet to hear a disrespectful response sent his way by Jay. I guess Jay knows where his bread is buttered after all.

  • AlbertoRipRon

    Chuck D the GOAT. Still dropping knowledge and science…hoping folks will start catching on.