KendrickLamar-LilWayne

Kendrick Lamar Refers To Lil Wayne As “The Greatest”


(AllHipHop News) There is no doubt Lil Wayne has influenced an entire generation of rap performers and rap followers. One fellow Hip Hop superstar has even referred to Weezy as “the greatest.” Kendrick Lamar did an interview with The Coveteur, and the West Coast representative applauded Wayne’s impact on culture.

[ALSO READ: Lil Wayne Talks Starring In Super Bowl & Samsung Commercials]

“We was just huge, still to this day, huge Lil Wayne fans. Lil Wayne is the greatest,” said Kendrick. “Not only because of his music but also because of the culture he put behind it. It was a big part of what he was talking about, so we always hold Lil Wayne in high regards. Juvenile as well.”

This is not the first time Kendrick offered praise to the Young Money leader. In 2014, K. Dot spoke with The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show, and he called the man also known as Tunechi a legend.

“People forget a lot of the work he’s put in and what he’s done for Hip Hop culture,” said Kendrick about Wayne at the time. “It’s phenomenal.”

[ALSO READ: Goodie Mob’s Big Gipp Praises Kendrick Lamar & J. Cole, Discusses Future’s Drug User Image (VIDEO)]

  • RapItUp

    This is true.. Wayne went all the way pop and fell off hard…. But dude is due his respects. He been rapping for a minute, and has a lot of fire bars in the rap banks. And with the influence of Jay Z, Black Album era, pioneered this young generation…

    • Q.

      Scary output.

      • RapItUp

        Lol that black album line was a bit tongue in cheek, but he really did ride that wave.. Jay birthed so many styles and rhetorics, listening to his catalogue

      • Q.

        Yes, Jay has hordes of d!ckriders. Yet most of his sycophants don’t even know what they like about him, other than “he got a lotta hits” and “he got money tho.” None of Jay’s idolaters rap remotely like him, they just repeat his catchphrases in blind adulation. Jay-Z was never the top artist…he was placed in the top spot.

        Lil Wayne was a D-level rapper who re-created himself into a legit B-level punch-liner. His improvement was probably the most surprising “comeback” in rap history. He was undoubtedly one of the most prolific artists ever…Unfortunately, his catalog could be summarized as “The Black Man’s Guide to Self-Destruction.”

      • RapItUp

        Lol welldamn.. Deep. And very accurate. Especially the D to B Wayne rise. Lol and his catalogue categorization, haha. Hilarious!

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        right except hov wasn’t placed at the top, he put himself there because he was just that good.

      • Q.

        “he put himself there” <—–HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAA!

        (Biggie laughing from the grave) "HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAA!"

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        meaning he took that title. it wasn’t handed to him. of course people loved him and his music. not just anybody can take the top, you have to be respected and above all, a great artist. but he declared himself top dog and everybody rode with it. read between the lines of what I was saying brother.

      • The City

        No he just had the backing of the machine.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        wrong. hov has pretty much been independent since reasonable doubt

      • The City

        Lmfao do you think a Indy artist get that many spins without the brass giving thousand dollar handshakes…

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        yes, back in the day. he was only huge on the east coast at first. you have to be a young buck lol

      • The City

        Look Jay’s alright and all but please don’t make him out to be some King of Kings lyrically…he’s good but not the best.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        hov is lyrically a great, and there’s a dozen other reasons on top of lyrics that makes him the goat

      • Richie_Ochoa

        Do your research D lJam didn’t push Jay-Z it was all him and dame. You internet haters hate Jay Z so much it’s ridiculous You forgot about it’s a hard knock life that song took him to the level he’s at today he took a sample that nobody thought could be use in Hip Hop and made it a crossover hit.

      • STEPH

        Machine???? Have you seen the tracklist for Reasonable Doubt, The Blue Print, Magna Carta Holy Grail, and the Black Album?????That’s at least 3 if not 4 classic albums homie lol.

      • Q.

        Going back to ’96-’97…Funny how Jay suddenly “took that title” after Big was murdered, even though NYC had plenty of great artists who were more respected –artists like, oh, Nas, for example.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        that’s what im saying! he TOOK that title. it wasn’t handed to him. you just proved my point. but I like hov though he deserves his cred

      • Q.

        LOL You notice how “took that title” was in quotations?

        …That means he didn’t take the title.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        you sir, are a talking contradiction

      • Q.

        Explain.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        u claim u know the 90s hip hop era, but then turn around and act like what I’m stating’s not fact.

      • Q.

        It’s not a fact. It’s your opinion…There was so much going on in ’96. Where did Jay-Z come from? He’s like the Jesse Jackson of rap–a placeholder for the fallen.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        “dropped reasonable doubt – they didn’t really appreciate it, till the second one came out” .. at the end of the day jay-z’s skills is what got him noticed and built his fanbase

      • Q.

        The fanbase came after the industry promoted him, not because of skills. Most chicks who vibed to his hits could give a fvck about wordplay. If anything, it was beats. But there were a hundred other lyricists with skills as nice if not nicer than Jay who could’ve gotten that big mainstream push, but they didn’t get that push. The question is “Why?”

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        im a big l fan all day but to knock how of his talent is ridiculous. honestly some cats just aint got the heart to be in jay’s position. u gotta be more than a lyricist to be at the top brush. swag, heart, charisma.. all that ties in to being the top guy. no coincidence hov is still relevant til this day

      • Q.

        I didn’t say Jay doesn’t have talent. I’m saying his talent isn’t why he was put on top. There are other talented artists with those same qualities who weren’t promoted the same way. Anybody can be made relevant with the right marketing behind them–it’s called social conditioning.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        so how do you explain artists like dmx, Eminem, 50 cent and even nas who were at one point just as big as Jay, but are no longer in that spot? they didn’t have the same qualities as hov. they don’t appeal to masses the same way Jay does. majority of people respect Jay for the exact same reason. someone they are inspired by/look up to/wanna be like. not just ANYbody can do that with social conditioning. anybody can be a star, not anybody can be the top guy, period. at the end of the day marketing cant make a man. X was an icon at one point, even bigger than hov in the late 90s early 00s, but what about now? at the end of the day marketing cant make the man brother.

      • Q.

        True, marketing doesn’t make the man, but it does make the image of the man. Think about it: Jay-Z is a household name for people who don’t even like rap–that’s the power of marketing, bro. Here’s something you need to understand: the same powers which control world government, politics and corporations, control the entertainment industry, including Hollywood and music. These people cherry-pick who they want to market and be the face(s) of the industry. You have to look at the whole movement of Hip-Hop over the past 25 years. Hip-Hop at it’s height was very radical and revolutionary. There was more Afrocentricity, consciousness, and unity, even from gangsta and party rappers. There was a lot of power there to influence the youth to gain knowledge and challenge the system. TPTB had to devise a way to derail that energy and get rap under control.

        In the mid-90’s, more negativity started coming in, sparking the East-West feud, climaxing in the deaths of the two most popular rap figures, Pac and Big. That was a dark moment for Hip-Hop. It paralleled the murders of Dr. King and Malcolm X, in the way it traumatized the Hip-Hop generation mentally. These were ritualistic killings. What people don’t understand is that they use that negative energy of bloodshed to actually shape reality. The reality of Hip-Hop was changed after that for the worse, but it also left a void of Pac and Big’s energy. They needed someone to continue the materialism wave that Puff and Big were promoting in rap, somebody who’d sell his soul for a dollar…So who do they bring in to replace Big? Your boy Jay. Puff himself tried to use Shyne, but that was a bust. Jay was someone clever enough to maintain the agenda while not getting tripped up in BS; he was controllable also, because he’s a selfish opportunist–he doesn’t care about uplifting Black people. He took the oath. He’s down with the enemy.

        Replacing 2Pac was more of a challenge, because he was so charismatic and influential. If you noticed, every other rapper was on that super-thug ish after Pac. In the aftermath, acts like Ja Rule, DMX, and every other Southern rapper rode on that Tupac wave. But Jay became the face of mainstream. Eminem was a different phenomenon–he blew up because of his white following. 50 Cent was a spin-off, a total industry-backed marketing scheme: the super gangsta/super thug, who benefitted from the backing of Jimmy Iovine, Dre and Em. Fast forward, Rick Ross is an even more improved, fabricated marketing scheme. Same thing with Drake–they’re promoting Drake like they did with Jay, except 10 X harder. Drake doesn’t represent Black people either. He’s down with the enemy. Follow the patterns of the business.

        At the end of the day, this is bigger than Hip-Hop–it’s about social control. The industry trains millions to follow people you don’t even like in order to influence your thoughts and behavior. They know how to force-feed product down your throat until you get used to the taste. Jay- Z is not the people’s champ–he’s a minion of the elite, used to derail the movement. Are you starting to see?

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        as an MC myself, I have a lot of respect for Jay-Z’s artistry. his honesty, his flow, his wordplay and his vocabulary are among the elites. not because he was forced on me, but because I dissect music, and jay is great at what he does. on the other hand, as a socially conscious black man, I agree with the points you made and I respect your pov. I cant argue with that at all. the music industry, more-so the “hip-hop game” definitely has it’s agenda and it gets harder and harder to find meaningful music anymore.

      • Q.

        Same here, I respect the craft. Jay-Z’s got talent. Thing is, I’m not even talking about Jay as an artist, I’m talking about what he and these other people represent, and how they’re used to manipulate the culture. It could’ve been 10 other rappers just as talented who could’ve been in Jay’s position, as the face of Hip-Hop. He was the one they chose and initiated. Jay knows who he is and what his role is–his reward was massive wealth and a trophy wife. But anytime these people sell their souls, they have to separate themselves from their own people in the process, not because they’re rich–that’s just part of the deal. That’s why on the Black Album, Jay said he wished he could rhyme like Talib Kweli and Common. Why? Because he knows he could’ve been doing that instead of peddling low-brow music. But part of the deal is, you cannot uplift your own people…and if you try to get too Black after you take that oath, you will be punished severely. So, they have to ride with the enemy to keep the pyramid in tact. Look at these dudes’ symbols and artwork. They’ve been showing you for years who they work for–people just can’t see what’s in front of their face, or they don’t want to believe it.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        jay has also done a lot of good hearted and charitable things. not everything is for the camera. you cant say that he’s all bad, or any of our black artists with wealth are all bad. sure they have to side with the devil because its business. the higher in any business you go in America is bound to have d’evils involved. you gotta ask yourself what would you do in that position. 700 million dollars where you know you can start generational wealth. something that we know white people have always had their ties with. if you had opportunities to get as much as you can while youre here to secure the futures of you children’s children’s children’s children, wouldn’t you do it? Im all for unifying the black people, but black people need to unify our families first. we cant just fault musicians for our struggles

      • Q.

        I think you’re misunderstanding what I’m talking about. I’m not saying people should blame musicians for our struggles. I’m talking about individuals who have made a conscious decision to sabotage the most powerful movement on planet Earth: Hip-Hop. I’m talking about people who are not only anti-Black, they are anti-Human. Jay-Z is just one of the pawns of these people. He’s only interested in being an elitist. That’s what he’s been telling you this whole time through song.
        Realize there has been a 20+ year campaign by the music industry to mind-control the Hip-Hop youth into degeneracy, to reinforce the school to prison pipeline in Black America, to reinforce white supremacy and the class system. Don’t underestimate the power of media and music to shape society. And don’t be fooled by philanthropy–some of the most wicked individuals and corporations in the world make philanthropic gestures. Donald Trump the billionaire has donated millions to charities over the years–is he a good man? You see, philanthropy is part of the elite’s facade; it’s just PR. It’s like the neighborhood druglord who passes out turkeys in the ghetto on Thanksgiving; that gesture doesn’t make them good people. It keeps the poor from turning against them. Or for some people, it helps clear a dirty conscience.
        People always use money as an object of validation, to justify all means and behavior. This is part of the capitalistic programming we’ve undergone in Western society; particularly, we’re taught the pursuit of wealth itself trumps all. That’s the imperialistic mindset which has destroyed the world. There’s nothing wrong with having means, but there is a such thing as excess wealth and materialism, especially in purely selfish pursuits. We can look at the state of the world today and clearly see that having a handful of obscenely wealthy individuals does not benefit society in any way. And worshiping these individuals is what keeps society trapped in the pyramid scheme. Yes, Black people need to unify their families…part of unification is fortifying our minds against the influence of the wicked, exposing our children to the right influences, and teaching them the value of assets over trinkets, to generate wealth purposefully, not just for the sake of taunting the poor. The world is rapidly changing, and the economy we’re living in is teetering on a cliff…Do you realize, that within 20 years, it’s possible the money we chase will have no value at all? The currency we use is already worthless, it’s only our belief which is propping it up. That will come to an end sooner than people think. We need to re-evaluate what we think we’re looking at.

      • DreamBigLiveLarge

        I know exactly what you’re talking about and im not disagreeing with you at all. im just saying in some cases we can just look at things at face value. jay-z’s music is not at all destructive, its just honest. so with that being said, at face value, he is a black man who made it out of a bad situation and took full advantage of his opportunity. if he was chosen to be the face of hip-hop, he took full advantage of that and is making as much money as possible – nothing wrong with that. which in turn gives our black youth a person they can relate to giving them hope. even if jay-z doesn’t care about the black youth, he doesn’t need to. just his pure being in the spot that he’s in gives black youth a clear image of what’s possible. even if its unobtainable, its better than all negative imagery. now when we dig deeper into all of the illuminati, masonic, elitist talk, it gets pretty messed up. but people aren’t meant to know celebrities on a personal level, that’s why theyre called celebrities… so when its viewed at face value theres nothing wrong with it.. I see way more damage being done with this new hiphop that’s coming up. which is also a part of the agenda, but theres NOTHING positive about that. even at face value.

      • Q.

        Jay-Z was chosen by the industry, not by the people. The people just latched on to the marketing scheme. He helped open the floodgates for all the degeneracy we see in rap today–cause and effect. You can’t tell me that the majority of his fans relate to his music, because I know white girls in the suburbs don’t understand half his lyrics. Okay, he sold crack in the projects… And? There are a thousand emcees who did the same who are far more positive influences and stood up against the system through song. There are positive rappers who are also millionaires, who represent Black people and the struggle. Yet, those artists weren’t promoted the way Jay was. That’s my point. I’m not saying Jay-Z doesn’t have a place, I’m saying that he was promoted as part of the agenda. People using someone else’s money as an excuse to follow them is getting played out. It’s like any douchebag with a number attached to their name can have a following, as evidenced by Donald Trump. “Unobtainable” is a good word–in a zero sum economy, it’s impossible for everyone to make $500 million, so encouraging everybody to chase that pipe dream is, in fact, promoting elitism/classism, the same engine which enslaved our people in the first place. There’s a difference between doing for self and selling your soul for a dollar. I mean literally, selling your soul for some worthless paper. I don’t admire Jay-Z beyond some witty wordplay. He’s alright, but he’s no hero of mine.

      • STEPH

        Took the title???? Reasonable Doubt (self explanatory), The Blueprint (the tracklist was insane), The Black Album, (the tracklist was insane) Magna Carta Holy Grail (the tracklist was insane)??? Classics bruh

      • Q.

        I’m talking about the ascendance of Jay-Z. Looking back to ’96, Jay was in the background when Biggie was poppin. Reasonable Doubt was alright, but a lot of good albums came out that year; it was one of the last years Hip-Hop was still diverse in the mainstream. Outside of the Biggie wave, Nas was the man in NYC, Wu-Tang had clout, Busta’s solo career was taking off, and there were a lot of competitive artists coming out of NYC at the time. My question is, who crowned Jay-Z the “king of rap?”

        My original comment was about Wayne, BTW.

      • STEPH

        He wasn’t the king of rap, but he was the one of the hottest if not the hottest for 5 or 6 summers str8 though….He’s in my T5DOA, but most certainly is T10DOA in about 90% of rap fans around the world…Not too many out there have done it better.

      • Q.

        Right–Jay wasn’t the king of rap. But he was catapulted into that position, after Biggie was taken out. He was the continuation of the “jiggy rap” era, aka the derailment of Hip-Hop music. “Who put him there?” is the question.

      • STEPH

        Nothing jiggy about Reasonable doubt, The Black Album, The Blue Print, or Magna Carta Holy Grail homie, and shame on you for even trying to make a connection to Will Smith’s jiggy bullshit….Maybe that Lox’s shit “If you think I’m Jiggy but nah….not Hov my G.

      • Q.

        That’s incorrect, bro. Will just jumped on the wave with that corny azz song–by ’97 he was more or less irrelevant to Hip-Hop music. I’m talking about this:

        “Wave em side to side and keep their hands high, while I give your girl the eye, Player please–lyrically niggas see, B.I.G. be flossing JIG on the cover of Fortune 5 double 0…” –“Mo Money, Mo Problems”

        ^See, that jiggy sh!t was from the Bad Boy era. All the shiny suit, Versace rap. It was the Lox, Mase, Puff, Big, then your man Jay-Z came right behind. Remember, Jay’s nicknamed himself “Jigga”–you know that came from “jiggy,” right? I always thought that was funny, because a “jigaboo” is a fvcking coon. And again, I’m talking about the beginning of Jay’s career, not the 2000’s era, but back when Jay-Z was on that “diggity-iggity” Das EFX flow. Jay was not that nice to suddenly bubble to the top off that one album. If that was the case, then Nas should have been the undisputed king of NY off of Illmatic alone. I’m telling you, certain mofos were handpicked to lead the culture astray. Jay is one of them. It’s the same with Drake 10 years later, except they pushed Drake on this generation even harder than they did with Jay…the n!gga even said “I turned into Jay” on the “Summer 16” joint. Notice how hard Hip-Hop fell the fvck off after Pac and Big’s murders. The culture took a sharp turn. That was by design!

      • The City

        He we go again…

    • ItGoesDownINtheDM

      they build you UP to tear you DOWN … wayne is prime example

      • Savimbi

        nah over exposure and saturation, he didn’t even give himself time to recreate himself and his bars & subject matter got redundant. I can bet my bottom dollar that if we were to line up the last 50 wayne records, each one would have a verse w/ the ” eat the pu$$y, kill the pu$$y” line. lol it never fails.

      • STEPH

        Birdman did that to Wayne, used that nigga like Def Jam did X and was finished with him .

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  • Q.

    The virtual savior of Millennial Hip-Hop pays homage to an artist who once said “Fvck Hip-Hop”…IRONY.

  • yomomma

    to each its own i guest…will ’02 lil wayne please stand up

  • Keyser Soze

    I’m not his biggest fan… But Hot Boy Wayne to sqad Wayne to mixtape Wayne up until about Carter 3 Wayne… He was one of the Best rappers that ever did it…

    • Tanman01

      One of the best ever? I wouldn’t go that far but his lyrical progression from the hot boys is noteworthy.

      • Keyser Soze

        Quality and quantity of work alone during that time span I think qualifies him… we know who the 80s and 90s gave us… but who better than Wayne from the 00s?

  • SoulFul Epic

    I have to agree. I just wish Weezy stayed hungry like on C2 and C3 … Hope C6 is a gem

  • The Wackness Vs Dope

    i held my tongue but now i feel is the right time to say this but… i ain’t even feeling Kendricks latest shits to be 100. I NEVER listen to that TPAB sh#t. sounds like nails on a black board wanna be avant guard sh#t. And the drinking screaming song sounds like a bad attempt and Eminems – Kim. i downloaded untitled like 2 weeks ago i haven’t even listened to it yet because i know it will be a chore – like doing the dishes after you let them pile up for a month. Wayne is not the greatest OMG f#ck outta here. he was at one brief point ONE of the greatest – at his prime. But so was LL COOL J – we don’t call him the greatest. NO ONE to this day NO ONE is f#cking with 2Pac, Biggie, Jay before Kingdom Come, Nas and Eminem before Encore.

    • Q.

      Yeah, I feel you. That TPAB sh!t made my head hurt. Fvck wrong with Kendrick, trying to be all lyrical and sh!t? I actually had to put headphones on to catch what da fvck he was saying n sh!t. I hate these supa dupa artsy azz n!ggas trying to make sophisticated music n sh!t…it’s like they’re trying to inspire people’s minds n sh!t. I HATE that sh!t bruh. Thinking hard about life and sh!t be giving me headaches! Oh yeah, and FVCK LL Cool J…I don’t understand how that bald bastard was the first rapper to be called the GOAT. Just because he was the man at age 17, was the prototypical successful solo rapper, was a well-respected emcee and ladies man, was an icon of masculinity, battled anybody and held his own, made a bunch of classic records, and probably has had the longest, consistent career in Hip-Hop history, that don’t mean sh!t! NOBODY considers him the greatest. I mean, that n!gga didn’t go to prison or even get shot to death–how can he be GREAT??? Lowkey, Chingy, Trinidad James, J-Kwon, Silk da Shokker, Flo-Rida, Mike Jones, and Young Thugger are the best to ever do it!

      • Savimbi

        #ether!!!!!!

      • STEPH

        Chingy? Mike Jones? and the rest of those niggas you named Q, hopefully you were being sarcastic or someone hacked your account because this doesn’t seem like you bruh lol. Pac, BIG, NAS, X, Jay T5DOA

      • Q.

        Feel the sarcasm, g.

      • All Headz Realize

        Stop putting Kendrick on the level of LL Cool J, bruh! LL made his own way at only 16 years of age, Kendrick showed potential then was propelled into where he’s at by Dr Dre’s propaganda. What classic Kendrick got, “swimming pool full of liquor and you dive in it”? Lol, at these grown man sounding and acting like boys and being given props for it. Man, I thought Kendrick was about 20-21 years old, had no idea he was almost 30! Get real!

      • Q.

        Hush, troll.

        “Real HipHop Head” <—LOL FOH

      • All Headz Realize

        You’re just one of them fake HipHop heads! On the low, you’re probably being paid by record labels to troll and spread their propaganda on popular music sites. You wack, dog!

      • Q.

        STFU, white boy. You corny.

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        lyrics were fine the beats though – this sin’t 1920 aint no body f#cking listening to jazz

      • Q.

        If all you heard on that album was jazz…you weren’t listening.

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        sorry african jungle drumbs and a black man in a zoot suit hitting an empty bucket

      • Q.

        You mad at African drums in music?

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        well it depends you know if i listen to something and i think it DOES NOT SOUND GOOD – does that make me mad?

      • Q.

        Yes. You seem upset, trying hard to prove a point to somebody who doesn’t care what you think…Why?

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        orrr… i made a comment in the comments section of the story. and someone else (YOU) became mad at me saying the music was rubbish. and then proceeded to try hard to prove to me (a person who doesn’t care what you think) why i should

      • Q.

        ^????? You sound stupid, troll. Go away now.

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        i’m a troll because i made a comment in the comment section? sorry judge dread ruler of all comments on the web. He who posses all royal opinion of nothingness

      • Q.

        No, you’re a troll for hopping on my nuts and refusing to let go. Shoo!

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        this is what comes to your mind first? this imagery?

      • Q.

        For you, nuthugger, yes.

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        steps away slowly and closes the door

      • Q.

        Now you’re learnin’… Don’t let the knob hit you on the way out!

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        okay you enjoy those knobs and sack grippings of yours

      • Q.

        LOL Enjoy sh!tty music and being alone.

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        enjoy picturing knobs and praying squinting hard to jesus that your sacks get pulled

      • Q.

        You still need attention, I see. …How much more?

      • The Wackness Vs Dope

        Yes

    • ItGoesDownINtheDM

      f*ck it … its just a title … and he said greatest and thats it … he didnt say the greatest rap mc etc… and if anything k.dot is just brainwashed by the marketing … cause since wayne has been out hes been marketing himself as the greatest rapper alive …..

  • I wonder where does Kendrick rank Wayne’s Ghostwriters . . . Where there’s smoke there’s Fire… Fireman, Fire, fire, fire . .. mann…..

  • big brain

    Wayne is a rap machine

  • therealest1

    This is politicking at its finest.

  • STEPH

    Tupac, Biggie, Nas, X, Jay Z. Tupac, BIG, and Nas need no explanation, but Jay and X held muthafu-kas down for summer after summer etc…both of them have at least 2-3 classic albums apiece hands down.

  • All Headz Realize

    Lol, Kendrick is definitely the new Lil Wayne, because his fans have anointed him as the greatest rapper tho he’s nowhere near. We’ll see Kendrick’s career in a couple of years, heads will be shocked the level his fans were trying to put him on! 2 very overrated rappers, neither one of them an MC!

    • SneakerHead ToToes

      L for you

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