made-album-cover

Scarface: MADE

 

What does it mean to be made? In the cinematic Cosa Nostra hierarchy, it’s the process of “making” an associate. Bringing him into the fold; making him virtually untouchable without proper say-so from other “Men of Honor.” A few artists have previously used it as an album title, but none are more deserving than Scarface (no offense Bleek). With a pedigree and tact that speaks to his character, he brings OG values with a contemporary swagger back to the forefront of the game with his newest work MADE (Rap-A-Lot / Asylum).”Never” opens the album with one of the oldest rules to date: “never testify or cop-out for a plea.” This keystone to the hood mentality is padded by valued advice; riding out on a beat provided by Drumma Boy & N.O. Joe. Joe is responsible for a lot of the heat from Last of A Dying Breed and Untouchable, which brings an updated yet familiar feel to the cascading drums. “Girl You Know” tricks out a sample from Lenny Williams’ “Cause I Love You,” which was used in Twista’s hit “Overnight Celebrity”, but the sentimentally is changed completely. Nottz is to thank for that, who has shown his hand at being a genius at revamping soul, in every sense imaginable. “Boy Meets Girl” progresses Scarface’s talents with narratives, and depicts the tragedy of life as a hustler, but through this tale shows how one can try not to fall victim. Still it presents the paradox of hood life; can we ever really escape?The back half of the album is stacked with inquisitive tracks that do more than just knock. “Who Do You Believe In” confronts artistic responsibility. The conclusion being that Scarface is only telling his life, as a cautionary tale and to signify his triumphs. It’s up to the individual what path they choose to take. It also comes at popular religion, politics, and self image. Face has developed a unique respect, enabling him to tackle such issues, and flex this muscle in inspiring form. “Git Out My Face” pulls from the previous track as it comes at those propagating fake images of hood success, because there is nothing a made man hates more than fake gangsters with no true rep. Lastly, “The Suicide Note” helps to further root the album in reality. With murky toms that could have been left over from Untouchable, Scarface scribes his last story on the album, with a curious choice of imagery. The lyrics are nimble and tight, and the pressure wound into the verse hold this track close to the street.It’s easy to get one top album, but the measure of an artist worth is consistency. That consistency translates directly into the respect of a listening audience that spans almost 20 years, and that’s based solely on solo artist credibility. While it can be assured that Scarface was made a long time ago, this album reminds that he will always be worthy of our favor.

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