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Movie Review: Mad Money

Have

you ever concocted a get-rich-quick scheme with a friend, feeling unsure if

you’d get away with it? Tossed up dollars bills with an unrelenting fear that

only a white-collar crime could produce? Lied and cheated the system like your

life depended on it, because in reality, it did?

 

Then

you’ll enjoy Queen Latifah, Katie Holmes, Ted Danson and Diane Keaton in

another get-rich-or-cry-trying tale called Mad

Money, due to release in theatres this Friday (January 18).

 

As

you can imagine, Mad Money is all about the Benjamin’s. What

makes this a different story of dollar bills is that it centers on the real

state of currency – how it’s shredded and disposed. For most of us that

desperately need those dollars, this realization makes for interesting cinema.

 

Middle-aged

and financially busted, Bridget Cardigan, (played by Diane

Keaton) is an ex-high society dweller. After her husband (Ted Danson) loses his

executive position, she’s motivated to find employment. Despairingly, she accepts

the only job available, as a janitor at the Federal

Reserve Bank in Kansas City. Surrounded by billions of dollars, she

dreams of regaining her status as privileged, if only someone would discover

her talents; of thievery and deception, of course.

 

Months

into her first paying gig in years, someone does; a quirky music-lover without

a care in the world (Katie Holmes) and a celibate mother of two who lives only

for her children (Queen Latifah). These three women cut a deal and put a plan

worth millions into place.

 

Suddenly,

life is fine in this hilarious and suspenseful comedy; money makes them happy

and the high that crime provides gets the best of them and their better halves.

But it’s not long before greed surfaces, and the trio realizes that the color

green is not only the shade on the bills.

 

Caught

between the money and the madness, between the dollars and the deals, the trio

fight for their freedom; enduring materialistic and cardinal desires while

keeping their boasting secrets hidden. Thankfully, Bridget has stronger desires

of her own, especially after bonding with women that she normally would’ve

never met, let alone befriended.

 

Essentially,

this is about friendship and the things that you’re willing to do to keep that

friendship alive and free. Want and need long for their freedom; whether lying

dormant in a woman who hasn’t felt a man in seven years, or forever present in

a woman who has experienced privilege most of her life. These two traits of

human nature make Mad Money

hilariously contagious, yet foolishly irrational.

 

If

you were around millions of dollars on a daily basis that wasn’t yours, would

you act on that want and that need? Would you plan to lie, cheat and steal?

Would you befriend someone that you had nothing in common with to help this

plan move forward? Would you, then, give it all up to keep the friendship?

After seeing Mad Money, I think I

would. Thankfully, I wouldn’t be alone.

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